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Fandom Programming

Fandom Programming

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Fandom programming can be intimidating to those not in the know, but fear not — this webinar will teach you the ins and outs of fandoms, including definitions, and it will give you a launching point to library fandom programming for all ages.

You don’t have to be an expert to lead a fandom program — just be as enthusiastic and open-minded as you would be for all of your library services.

Learn how to incorporate new and trending fandoms and themes into library programming for tweens, teens, and adults.

Katie LaMantia is in Collection Development at Baker and Taylor and is a former Teen Librarian at the Schaumburg Township District Library in Schaumburg, Illinois. She has a personal and professional appreciation and interest in pop culture and has presented at multiple library conferences about programming, teens, and technology. When she’s not finding amazing books for young adults, she enjoys reading, writing, traveling, and extreme adventure activities. She is the co-author of A Year of Programs for Millennials and More (ALA Editions, 2015), 50+ Fandom Programs: Planning Festivals and Events for Tweens, Teens, and Adults (ALA Editions, 2017), Pop Culture-Inspired Programs for Tweens, Teens, and Adults (ALA Editions, 2018), and 50+ Programs for Tweens, Teens, Adults, and Families (ALA Editions, 2020).

Emily Vinci is the Fiction Manager specializing in adult readers’ advisory at the Schaumburg Township District Library in Schaumburg, Illinois. Her professional interests are promoting the acquisition and appreciation of comics and graphic novels in libraries. She presents frequently about pop culture and niche library programming and co-authored the books A Year of Programs for Millennials and More (ALA Editions, 2015), 50+ Fandom Programs: Planning Festivals and Events for Tweens, Teens, and Adults (ALA Editions, 2017), Pop Culture-Inspired Programs for Tweens, Teens, and Adults (ALA Editions, 2018), and 50+ Programs for Tweens, Teens, Adults, and Families (ALA Editions, 2020).

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In partnership with PLAN,  webinars originally presented to their membership can now be found and accessed through Florida Library Webinars.

If you have questions about a session, contact PLAN.

Embracing Race in Children’s Programming

Embracing Race in Children’s Programming

Children are not colorblind. Research has shown that children recognize race at a very young age and even develop racial biases by age 5. (​https://inclusions.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/Children-are-Not-Colorblind.pdf​)
As storytellers and educators we have a moral obligation to teach not only the basics of early literacy, but also learn more about and celebrate racial differences. By pointing out the color of one’s skin and naming it in a positive manner we give children a vast and more authentic view of the world. In this webinar we will discuss our professional experience exploring race through age appropriate children and family programming.

 

We will provide an extensive list of resources, such as favorite picture books, databases, and ways to bring inclusivity to any program.

Attendees will learn how to:

Choose appropriate materials for subject matter, cross-group books, own voices (BIPOC), and how to begin the process of identifying our own personal biases.
Create opportunities for safe conversations about race and racial injustices in age-appropriate ways and present talking points to children and their caregivers
Example of past programs and community partnerships
Examine our own biases with honesty, compassion and mindfulness
Briefly touch upon the concepts of white privilege and anti-racism
Use ALA guidelines to support a bigger understanding of race
Explore resources such as the database Diverse Book Finder, Colorfulpages.org, and online communities

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Original broadcast November 5, 2020 

Biography ~ Melanie Borski-Howard
Melanie has studied music, theater and received her Masters in English from Utah State University. She is currently a Youth Services Librarian at Boulder Public Library in Boulder Colorado, where she has been doing storytimes since she started in 2002. She does 4-5 storytimes a week and incorporates music into everyone. She is currently in her Second Season of the local televised program, Read With Us. (https://boulderlibrary.org/youth/read-with-us/)

Biography ~ Carolyn Valencia
Carolyn Valencia is an Outreach Librarian for the High Plains Library District (HPLD) specializing in early literacy. She earned her MLIS in 2019 from Emporia State University and a Bachelor of Arts from Santa Clara University in 1998. Carolyn shares her passion for the arts and multiliteracies (primarily physical and self-literacy) with her diverse community members in Greeley, Colorado. With this life-long passion for physical literacy, Carolyn pursued careers in dance and Bikram Yoga before libraryland. In 2014, she helped create HPLD’s first Yoga Storytime and has implemented these at the Colorado Early Education Network (CEEN) Head Starts in Weld County, as well as the Little Learner’s Preschool at the Immigrant and Refugee Center of Northern Colorado (IRCNOCO) over the last five years. In 2019, she became a certified Stories, Songs, and Stretches!® F acilitator. C urrently, she is working on outcome-based measurements for early literacy outreach services and strives to provide diverse and inclusive programming to her community as a co-facilitator of Rainbow Storytimes and Let’s Talk About Race Storytimes. Carolyn enjoys practicing yoga, gardening, and spending time with her loved ones.

Literacy Doodads in Pandemic Times

Literacy Doodads in Pandemic Times

 

 

 

Think back to when the sudden shutdown of services was imposed. Did you find yourself looking for some fun literacy-based activities to use in virtual outreach? When you were suddenly faced with no face-to-face interactions with your usual storytime crowd or students, did you join the Queue of librarians and teachers seeking things to spark imagination during the “Q?”

Come on a Quest with a children’s librarian and presenter of workshops on early childhood literacy as she demonstrates how “Literacy Doodads” can enhance online presentations as well as in-person programming, all while incorporating ECRR.

Among other things, attendees will learn the following literacy-enhancing and family friendly activities:
How to recognize and capitalize on Literacy Doodads (Hint: you may already have several!)
How to use recycled materials to create a myriad stash of alphabet letters that can be used for games, puzzles, crafts and more!
How to have fun in the kitchen making personalized pancakes and waffles, fruit kebabs, pizzas, and even gingerbread houses – all involving the alphabet! YUM!

Original broadcast October 27, 2020

Biography ~ Kathy Barco
Following her retirement as literacy coordinator at Albuquerque/Bernalillo County Library System, Kathy Barco became a freelance library consultant specializing in early literacy and intellectual freedom. She was a children’s librarian with the ABC Library and served five years as youth services coordinator for the New Mexico State Library.
Kathy co-edited True Stories of Censorship Battles in America’s Libraries, published by ALA Editions in 2012.

Her fifth book, Storytime and Beyond: Having Fun with Early Literacy, co-authored with Melanie Borski-Howard, was published by Libraries Unlimited in October 2018. Kathy received her MLIS from the University of Southern Mississippi. She lives in Albuquerque with her husband and two cats.

Little Hands Signing in Storytime

Little Hands Signing in Storytime

 

Signing with little ones of all ages promotes early literacy skills, encourages interaction, and makes your programs instantly participative. Learn how to incorporate American Sign Language into your programs for babies, toddlers, and preschoolers in a respectful and meaningful way with Kathy MacMillan, nationally certified American Sign Language interpreter, librarian, author, and storyteller. You’ll leave with a toolbox of vocabulary and activities to get started with right away!

Learning Objectives:
• List 3 benefits of signing with children
• Demonstrate at least 6 American Sign Language signs to use with young children
• Identify at least 1 storytime song, story, or rhyme to use with signs

Original broadcast October 20, 2020

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Biography ~ Kathy MacMillan
Kathy MacMillan is a nationally certified American Sign Language interpreter, librarian, and storyteller. She is the author of the Little Hands Signing series from Familius Press, as well as Little Hands and Big Hands: Children and Adults Signing Together (Huron Street Press) as well as many other resources books for librarians and educators. She shares resources for signing with children at StoriesByHand.com.

Genrefication in the Library

Genrefication in the Library

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Primary school students are very visual in their book choices. Arrangement of books greatly affects how students make choices. Since most students ask for books by broad topics, e.g. books about puppies or dinosaurs or cars or presidents, Jan decided to make the leap and genrefy the entire library, fiction and nonfiction, by topic. The initial reaction was very promising and circulation patterns changed, but Jan took an opportunity for a new challenge at the neighboring Holley Navarre Middle the next year.

This presentation is a collection of what she learned while genrefying the HNP library, genrification stories from other area librarians, and tentative plans to do some genrefication at her current middle school library. It focuses on anecdotes of individual librarians and their genrefication projects to exemplify the reasons, the work involved, and the outcomes of these projects.

Jan Macauley has been a school library media specialist for 12 years, with an MIS from Florida State University. She is currently the librarian at Holley Navarre Middle School in Navarre, FL. Jan got interested in genrefication while looking for ways to improve student access at the library at Holley Navarre Primary School, where she worked for 11 years. She believes libraries are all about access, connecting people of all types to whatever piques their interests and serves their needs. Prior to becoming a librarian, Jan worked in environmental science for 20 years. She discovered that environmental and library sciences have a lot in common and many of the same tools – classification, description, cataloging – are essential in both disciplines.

In partnership with PLAN,  webinars originally presented to their membership can now be found and accessed through Florida Library Webinars.

If you have questions about a session, contact PLAN.

How to Run a Librarian in Training Program For Children

How to Run a Librarian in Training Program For Children

 

Johnson City (Tennessee) Public Library”s Librarian-in-Training program is a 15-week program for children ages nine to twelve that provides an overview of library occupations and services. Children spend two hours in each department of the library, as well as attend a board meeting, over the fifteen sessions, to see how all of the parts contribute to the whole.

In this interactive and informative program, learn how to adapt this program for your library, and share your knowledge and enthusiasm with potential future librarians.

Specifically, attendees will learn to:
Adapt the basic components of the Librarian-in-Training program to fit your individual library’s needs
Promote the program within your own organization and gather staff buy-in for participation
Formulate an outreach plan to target specific interested children

Original broadcast August 11, 2020

Biography ~ Jennifer Johnson
Jennifer Johnson has worked with the Youth Services department of the Johnson City Public Library in Tennessee for the past seven years. She has held her current position of School Age Program Coordinator for three years. Her background is in English Literature and Early Childhood Education, both of which have served her well in the library field. She loves working with children and helping them develop a love of reading and learning.

The Nuts and Bolts of Building a More Inclusive Children’s Collection

The Nuts and Bolts of Building a More Inclusive Children’s Collection

As Rudine Sim Bishop so beautifully stated, great books for children are “windows, mirrors and sliding doors” that create a sense of belonging as well as bridges of empathy and mutual understanding. Join Kirsten Nilsson, Summit County Library’s Children’s Librarian, as she discusses the “how” and “why” of building more inclusive children’s library collections. She’ll give suggestions for assessing our current collections to determine what we have, and what we may be missing, that could cause our readers to feel invisible or unimportant. She’ll also provide resources for how to dig deeper into this subject of inclusion and where to find the best books to broaden the reach of our collections so that every reader can find themselves on the shelves of our libraries.

Learning Objectives:
• Be able to evaluate your collection for diverse children’s books
• Have resources to broaden your collection
• Be able to discuss the value of a diverse collection with staff and management

Original broadcast June 2, 2020

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Biography ~ Kirsten Nilsson
As the Children’s Librarian for the Summit County Libraries, in Utah, Kirsten Nilsson wants all children to know that they are an important part of a vibrant and diverse community—she works hard to see that all of their stories are reflected in her library’s children’s collections and programs. She spends the rest of her time working on story times, baby rhyme times, summer reading programs, mother/daughter book group discussions, book reviews and having lots of fun training her new Goldendoodle puppy “Pippi” to be her library’s resident READ dog.

 

A Book Club for Adults with Intellectual Disabilities: The Journey of an Academic Librarian

A Book Club for Adults with Intellectual Disabilities: The Journey of an Academic Librarian

 

Discover how leading a successful book club for college students with intellectual disabilities (ID) at a university campus led one librarian on a leadership adventure that she never quite expected. By working with this unique group of college students, she grew personally, learned how to step outside of her comfort zone, and had a lot of fun while realizing the importance of not taking life too seriously.

In this session, the audience should expect to learn how taking calculated risks can pay off in one’s leadership journey. In addition, attendees will understand the value of working with individuals who differ from them as a way to gain unique perspectives. Having no previous experience working with those with intellectual disabilities, and no special education training, the librarian benefitted from the knowledge and rare experiences she shared with this special population, while forming new friendships.

As a result of this presentation, the audience will learn the following:

• Invaluable benefits of working with students who have intellectual disabilities or anyone with differing abilities
• Rewards of stepping outside of one’s comfort zone and taking calculated risks
• Importance of keeping an open mind and an open heart

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Original broadcast May 12, 2020 

Biography ~ Leah Plocharczyk
Leah Plocharczyk is the Assistant Director of the John D. MacArthur Campus Library at FAU’s Jupiter campus where she oversees all aspects of the library’s operation. She is active in mentoring students, as well as leadership and library outreach. She has published articles on library collaboration with marine mammal stranding networks and conflict management within libraries. She is currently co-authoring a book about the importance of library book clubs as educational tools for adults with intellectual disabilities.

 

Virtual Storytimes: Filming Before, During, and After COVID- 19

Virtual Storytimes: Filming Before, During, and After COVID- 19

The world was turned upside down in early 2020. Many libraries were closed suddenly and children’s librarians were asked to do storytimes online, some with materials and some without. Authors and musicians were giving permission for use, but the rules of copyright have, and continue to be dubious. This brings up many important issues as to what our role is as library storytellers before, during and after this pandemic. This webinar hopes to answer questions regarding virtual storytimes and empower library workers to rise to the challenge of providing professional online early literacy to our patrons.
Our presenters will answer common questions about copyright, best practices, technology, accessibility and more. Our presenters are also happy to take follow-up questions and chat more!

Attendees will learn how to:
● Get a basic idea of how copyright works
● Find resources for copyrighted material before, after and during COVID 19
● Implement best practices in every storytime including accessibility
● Filming tips and strategies for a virtual storytime
● Do storytimes with limited materials
● Technology tips for doing storytime from home

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Original broadcast May 13, 2020

 

Biography ~ Melanie Borski-Howard and Friends
Melanie has studied music, theater and received her Masters in English from Utah State University. She is currently a Youth Services Librarian at Boulder Public Library in Boulder Colorado, where she has been doing storytimes since she started in 2001.

Melanie had a library goal of creating a BLOG (similar to JBRARY) in 2016, but once she started collaborating with Boulder Channel 8 television station, the BLOG evolved to an actual filming of her storytimes with Alice. She is currently in her second season of the local televised program, Read With Us where they have filmed 14 shows. (https://boulderlibrary.org/youth/read-with-us/)

How to Run a Librarian in Training Program For Children

Busy Babies: Building Baby Playdates for Your Library

 

 

Play is one of the Early Literacy skills outlined in Every Child Ready to Read. Yet, babies in libraries are often overlooked in play programming, because there has traditionally been a struggle to engage their parents and caregivers enough to merit bringing babies to the library. While baby story times have often been champions of early literacy, they often leave out explorative and sensory play, opting for lap sit activities to contain the chaos.

At Suffolk Public Library, our Busy Babies program has had upwards of 90 people attend to play with their babies in the library, simply by hosting a monthly baby playdate. Join us for this interactive and informative program and discover how easy it is to engage this age group and their caregivers in sensory play, tummy time, and messy free play. Benefits for parents and caregivers who bring their babies to this program will also be discussed.

Participants will learn:
• The why and how for creating a baby playdate
• How to create stations for play that can be shared system-wide
• Strategies for engaging parents/ caregivers with their babies through sensory play

Original broadcast February 27, 2020

Biography ~ April Watkins
April has worked with children in some capacity her entire adult life, including six years as a high school journalism teacher, and three years as a Children’s Librarian. She can regularly be seen rocking rainbow knee-high socks, tulle skirts, blue hair, and pigtails as she embodies her childhood heroes, Rainbow Bright and Punky Brewster. She loves scrapbooking, alternative music, dystopian YA novels, and binge-watching. April has a BS in Education from Bowling Green State University and a MA in Library and Information Sciences from the University of South Florida. She currently serves as the Early Childhood Services Senior Librarian for Suffolk Public Library where she has started a city-wide reading initiatives, and transformed the way SPL conducts Early Literacy Outreach. She lives in Smithfield, VA with her husband, two sons, and their very large St. Bernard.