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Negotiation and Cost Containment for eCollections

Negotiation and Cost Containment for eCollections

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Working with Vendors: Negotiation Strategies for Cost Containment

To help meet the information needs of patrons, libraries must license electronic resources at the lowest possible cost with the best possible terms. This session is intended to help librarians negotiate better contracts with vendors for licensing databases, online journals, eBooks, and streaming media.

Topics to be addressed include the following:

  • General overview of how licensing and negotiation support collection development strategy in 21st Century libraries
  • Gathering and sharing intelligence about the information marketplace
  • Maintaining effective business relationships with vendors
  • Negotiation for librarians (preparation, techniques, and useful practices)
  • Cost containment strategies and business models
  • License terms that require special attention
  • Issues for further consideration: COVID-19 and more

Presenter Bio:

George Stachokas is the Collections Strategist and Acquisitions Librarian at Auburn University Libraries. Originally from Indiana, his professional roles at academic libraries in Indiana and Alabama have included nearly ten years of experience in negotiating complex license agreements for electronic resources. George is the author of two books, The Role of the Electronic Resources Librarian (Chandos, 2019) and After the Book: Information Services for the 21st Century (Chandos, 2014), as well as editor of Reengineering the Library: Issues in Electronic Resources Management (American Library Association, 2018). He holds an MLIS degree from the University of Illinois, an MA in History from Indiana State University, and a BS in Economics from Purdue University.

In partnership with TBLC,  webinars originally presented to their membership can now be found and accessed through Florida Library Webinars.

If you have questions about a session, contact TBLC.

Love for All: Current Trends in Romance

Love for All: Current Trends in Romance

 

Romance readers are voracious and as librarians, we need to keep up with their appetites. Trends in romance shift and change, and if you’re not an avid reader of the genre you may not be up to date on what books are hot.

Public librarian and romance devotee Amy Dittmeier will explore current trends and authors that all romance readers can enjoy and will discuss the slow work publishers are doing to make the genre more diverse.

In this steamy and informative program, attendees will:

• Learn what makes a romance novel and how the modern romance novel has evolved into what it is today
• Identify titles to diversify your library’s romance collection
• Examine the romance industry and romance reader habits in order to better serve your population

Handout

Original broadcast April 29, 2021 

Presenter ~ Amy Dittmeier
Amy Dittmeier is a public librarian living and working in the Chicagoland area. They became a romance fan during their MLIS program and haven’t looked back since. Amy graduated from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee with their MLIS in 2016 and has been in public libraries ever since. In their spare time Amy writes book reviews for Love in Panels and Booklist, and is constantly working on their TBR pile.

Weed ‘Em and Weep: Hoarding is not Collection Development

Weed ‘Em and Weep: Hoarding is not Collection Development

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Reap the benefits of a well-weeded collection! This session will discuss weeding techniques, how to motivate reluctant weeders, and the public relations side of weeding.

Participants will find the joy in a shelf list that reflects a clean, relevant, and current collection!

Holly Hibner is the Adult Services Coordinator at the Plymouth District Library in Plymouth, Michigan. She has a mild obsession with weeding (ok, maybe not so mild), and can often be found walking the stacks looking for missing, damaged, and just plain weird titles. She also loves all things techie and the challenge of a good reference question. Holly is riding high and pulling all the glory out of her second term as a Councilor-at-Large for the American Library Association.

Mary Kelly is the Digital Resources and Emerging Technologies Librarian at the Plymouth District Library in Plymouth, Michigan. She is passionate about collection quality and, when she’s not wrangling with Overdrive, she is usually hunched over the computer looking at spreadsheets. She spent a few years in Youth Services, molding young minds through Toddler Disco, but recently returned to the promised land of Adult Services. For street cred, Holly and Mary co-authored the book “Making a Collection Count: A Holistic Approach to Library Collection Management.” Reading it will surely change your life, so interlibrary loan a copy today! They are also co-authors of the popular blog “Awful Library Books.”

Class Resources

Chat log

In partnership with PLAN,  webinars originally presented to their membership can now be found and accessed through Florida Library Webinars.

If you have questions about a session, contact PLAN.

Collection Management Basics

Collection Management Basics

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This program starts with the basics, with beginning collection managers in mind. We will go through the collection life cycle and offer tips and efficiencies for managing a collection along the way, from selection to weeding and everything in between.

Holly Hibner is the Adult Services Coordinator at the Plymouth District Library in Plymouth, Michigan. She has a mild obsession with weeding (ok, maybe not so mild), and can often be found walking the stacks looking for missing, damaged, and just plain weird titles. She also loves all things techie and the challenge of a good reference question. Holly is riding high and pulling all the glory out of her second term as a Councilor-at-Large for the American Library Association.

Mary Kelly is the Digital Resources and Emerging Technologies Librarian at the Plymouth District Library in Plymouth, Michigan. She is passionate about collection quality and, when she’s not wrangling with Overdrive, she is usually hunched over the computer looking at spreadsheets. She spent a few years in Youth Services, molding young minds through Toddler Disco, but recently returned to the promised land of Adult Services. For street cred, Holly and Mary co-authored the book “Making a Collection Count: A Holistic Approach to Library Collection Management.” Reading it will surely change your life, so interlibrary loan a copy today! They are also co-authors of the popular blog “Awful Library Books.”

Class Resources

Slides

Chat Log

In partnership with PLAN,  webinars originally presented to their membership can now be found and accessed through Florida Library Webinars.

If you have questions about a session, contact PLAN.

Negotiation and Cost Containment for eCollections

Cataloging Graphic Novels and Comics

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This one hour session will cover the basic definitions related to graphic novels and comics using a variety of fiction and nonfiction examples for demonstration. The session will pay special attention to descriptive cataloging areas, their associated RDA instructions, and the MARC 21 tags to use. It will also address considerations for subject analysis, genre vocabulary, and classification choices. At the end of the session, participants will a) have definitions for the variety of resources generally attributed as “graphic novels,” b) know the best practices for descriptive cataloging of graphic novels, and c) understand the various choices for classification and subject analysis.

Audience: Cataloging staff and other staff who work with graphic novels and comics.

Presenter: Bobby Bothmann is a professor at Minnesota State University, Mankato where he serves as the catalog and metadata librarian. Bobby catalogs analog and digital resources of all kinds, including books, serials, moving images, objects, cartographic resources, musical and spoken word audio recordings, and music in between many meetings. He is a member of the editorial board for Cataloging & Classification Quarterly and an active member of OLAC (OnLine Audiovisual Catalogers) where he has served in various leadership roles including treasurer and president. He holds an MLIS from the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee and an MS in Geography and English Technical Communication from MSU Mankato. Bobby moonlights as an adjunct instructor for the School of Information Science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign where he teaches cataloging and classification courses and tries to covert one student per semester to the cataloging side of the Force.

In partnership with TBLC,  webinars originally presented to their membership can now be found and accessed through Florida Library Webinars.

If you have questions about a session, contact TBLC.

Copyright Policies & Workflows for Your Library

Copyright Policies & Workflows for Your Library

 

Does your library have a copyright policy? Have you wondered if you can post your story hour online? Or make copies of books for patrons? Or offer 3D printing? Copyright can be confusing and, many times, the questions asked about it are not easy to answer. Knowing the basics of the copyright system and how to rely on a policy can make copyright less confusing.

In this informative session, learn what makes up copyright, how to use your library’s copyright policy to consistently answer copyright questions, and develop copyright research workflows (how to find and receive permissions) that will help improve your library operations.

Learning Objectives:

• Become more familiar with the core rights and exceptions of copyright
• Know how and why to create a copyright policy
• Best practices for implementing a policy to improve workflow

Original broadcast September 1, 2020 

Biography ~ Allyson Mower
Allyson Mower is an academic librarian with over ten years of experience in copyright librarianship. She is the author of the forthcoming book “Copyright Policies & Workflows in Libraries” to be published by Rowman & Littlefield in June 2020. Allyson also founded the Copyright Education Committee of the Utah Library Association and currently serves as head of scholarly communication & copyright at the University of Utah’s Marriott Library.

Database Promotion from the Inside Out

Database Promotion from the Inside Out

 

 

 

 

This interactive presentation combines skills and techniques used for reference, outreach, and e-resources management to share guidelines to promote library databases. We’ll provide tips and tricks for quickly and thoughtfully evaluating and using any database, focusing on database promotion both internally with frontline staff and colleagues and externally to patrons and stakeholders. You will brainstorm and discuss promotional activities at your own library, and afterward, be equipped to share your knowledge with others.

Learning Outcomes:
1. Apply techniques to quickly evaluate any database.
2. Explain the value of database promotion to different groups of people.
3. Develop outreach activities focused on database promotion.

Handout

Original broadcast July 16, 2020


Biography ~ Joanna Milner

Joanna has been digging up information and good reads for Multnomah County Library patrons for more than 20 years. She is currently the chair of the Oregon Library Association Reference Round Table and has served as a Mozilla Foundation Web Literacy Leader. She has presented programs on web literacy, dominating databases, and adult books with teen appeal.

Biography ~ Amy Coughenour
Amy has worked in libraries for over 10 years in areas including virtual reference, reference, instruction, distance education, scholarly communication, outreach, and electronic resources management. After starting in virtual reference and academic libraries, she now supports state government employees as a member of the Government Information and Library Services division of the State Library of Oregon.

It’s No Mystery: Plan Programs to Engage Your Crime Fiction Fans

It’s No Mystery: Plan Programs to Engage Your Crime Fiction Fans

 

Crime fiction in its many forms is perennially popular. There’s something about a good mystery that draws our patrons in. Take advantage of this passion and bring your patrons in with mystery-related programming.

Participants will:
• Discuss passive programming and displays
• Explore potential partnerships with mystery writers and enthusiasts in their communities
• Learn about the fun a mystery night and/or a regular mystery book group can bring to their library, along with best practices and   tips for maintaining those programs

Handout

Original broadcast June 11, 2020 

Biography ~ Cari Dubiel
Cari is the Adult Learning and Information Services Manager at Twinsburg Public Library. She is also a writer, teacher, and podcaster. She is a former Library Liaison to Sisters in Crime, an organization of 3600 crime writers and readers nationwide.

Collection Development in Public Libraries

Collection Development in Public Libraries

It is often said that libraries are about more than books, but users might not always agree. Have you ever wondered how library collections are built and maintained? Why do we spend so much time and effort on our collections? What do you need to know to be a good selector? How do ethics and intellectual freedom issues come into play in collection development?
In this interactive and informative program, you’ll get an overview of collection development in public libraries and join in a discussion of the trends and issues facing selectors and collection development work.

Handout

Original broadcast April 23, 2020

Biography ~ Barry Trott

Barry Trott is Special Projects and Technical Services Director at the Williamsburg (VA) Regional Library, where he coordinates the library’s communications and marketing, statistical analysis, digital collections, services, and programs, including the library website, and acquisitions and cataloging. Barry earned his MSLS from The Catholic University of America School of Library and Information Science in 1997 and has worked since then at the Williamsburg Regional Library, starting off as a reference librarian and then as readers’ services librarian. In 2001, he became Adult Services Director, and in 2012 was appointed Digital Services Director, where he served until 2014 when he was appointed to his current position.
Barry is past-president of the American Library Association’s Reference and User Services Association (RUSA). He edited the readers’ advisory column for Reference and User Services Quarterly (RUSQ) from 2004-2012 and served as editor of RUSQ from 2012-18. He also writes for the NoveList database.

How to Translate the Data We Collect Into Stories

How to Translate the Data We Collect Into Stories

 

Collecting numbers, aka quantitative data, answers many questions regarding your library. How many people in your service area have library cards and how has that changed in the last five years? Are more or less senior citizens coming to events? Which nonfiction books are circulating the most?

But numbers don’t tell about the lonely teen discovering a safe haven to create graphic novels. Or the overwhelmed grandmother, now custodian of her toddler grandkids, finding respite and friendship during programs on Reading Readiness and parenting.

In this program, we’ll discuss:

• What makes a compelling library story
• Where to find the best story tellers of all ages and backgrounds
• How to engage your community’s or institution’s talent to put stories into pictures and videos
• How to keep your collection of stories fresh

Handout

Original broadcast April 14, 2020 

 

Biography ~ Pat Wagner
Pat Wagner has been a library trainer and consultant since 1978. She also has a background in the performing, literary, and visual arts as a performance poet and storyteller, playwright, graphic designer, and writer of fantasy fiction. She grew up in a family of storytellers and is currently recording those stories and accompanying photos to share with family members across the globe.