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Copyright Policies & Workflows for Your Library

Copyright Policies & Workflows for Your Library

 

Does your library have a copyright policy? Have you wondered if you can post your story hour online? Or make copies of books for patrons? Or offer 3D printing? Copyright can be confusing and, many times, the questions asked about it are not easy to answer. Knowing the basics of the copyright system and how to rely on a policy can make copyright less confusing.

In this informative session, learn what makes up copyright, how to use your library’s copyright policy to consistently answer copyright questions, and develop copyright research workflows (how to find and receive permissions) that will help improve your library operations.

Learning Objectives:

• Become more familiar with the core rights and exceptions of copyright
• Know how and why to create a copyright policy
• Best practices for implementing a policy to improve workflow

Original broadcast September 1, 2020 

Biography ~ Allyson Mower
Allyson Mower is an academic librarian with over ten years of experience in copyright librarianship. She is the author of the forthcoming book “Copyright Policies & Workflows in Libraries” to be published by Rowman & Littlefield in June 2020. Allyson also founded the Copyright Education Committee of the Utah Library Association and currently serves as head of scholarly communication & copyright at the University of Utah’s Marriott Library.

Database Promotion from the Inside Out

Database Promotion from the Inside Out

 

 

 

 

This interactive presentation combines skills and techniques used for reference, outreach, and e-resources management to share guidelines to promote library databases. We’ll provide tips and tricks for quickly and thoughtfully evaluating and using any database, focusing on database promotion both internally with frontline staff and colleagues and externally to patrons and stakeholders. You will brainstorm and discuss promotional activities at your own library, and afterward, be equipped to share your knowledge with others.

Learning Outcomes:
1. Apply techniques to quickly evaluate any database.
2. Explain the value of database promotion to different groups of people.
3. Develop outreach activities focused on database promotion.

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Original broadcast July 16, 2020


Biography ~ Joanna Milner

Joanna has been digging up information and good reads for Multnomah County Library patrons for more than 20 years. She is currently the chair of the Oregon Library Association Reference Round Table and has served as a Mozilla Foundation Web Literacy Leader. She has presented programs on web literacy, dominating databases, and adult books with teen appeal.

Biography ~ Amy Coughenour
Amy has worked in libraries for over 10 years in areas including virtual reference, reference, instruction, distance education, scholarly communication, outreach, and electronic resources management. After starting in virtual reference and academic libraries, she now supports state government employees as a member of the Government Information and Library Services division of the State Library of Oregon.

It’s No Mystery: Plan Programs to Engage Your Crime Fiction Fans

It’s No Mystery: Plan Programs to Engage Your Crime Fiction Fans

 

Crime fiction in its many forms is perennially popular. There’s something about a good mystery that draws our patrons in. Take advantage of this passion and bring your patrons in with mystery-related programming.

Participants will:
• Discuss passive programming and displays
• Explore potential partnerships with mystery writers and enthusiasts in their communities
• Learn about the fun a mystery night and/or a regular mystery book group can bring to their library, along with best practices and   tips for maintaining those programs

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Original broadcast June 11, 2020 

Biography ~ Cari Dubiel
Cari is the Adult Learning and Information Services Manager at Twinsburg Public Library. She is also a writer, teacher, and podcaster. She is a former Library Liaison to Sisters in Crime, an organization of 3600 crime writers and readers nationwide.

Collection Development in Public Libraries

Collection Development in Public Libraries

It is often said that libraries are about more than books, but users might not always agree. Have you ever wondered how library collections are built and maintained? Why do we spend so much time and effort on our collections? What do you need to know to be a good selector? How do ethics and intellectual freedom issues come into play in collection development?
In this interactive and informative program, you’ll get an overview of collection development in public libraries and join in a discussion of the trends and issues facing selectors and collection development work.

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Original broadcast April 23, 2020

Biography ~ Barry Trott

Barry Trott is Special Projects and Technical Services Director at the Williamsburg (VA) Regional Library, where he coordinates the library’s communications and marketing, statistical analysis, digital collections, services, and programs, including the library website, and acquisitions and cataloging. Barry earned his MSLS from The Catholic University of America School of Library and Information Science in 1997 and has worked since then at the Williamsburg Regional Library, starting off as a reference librarian and then as readers’ services librarian. In 2001, he became Adult Services Director, and in 2012 was appointed Digital Services Director, where he served until 2014 when he was appointed to his current position.
Barry is past-president of the American Library Association’s Reference and User Services Association (RUSA). He edited the readers’ advisory column for Reference and User Services Quarterly (RUSQ) from 2004-2012 and served as editor of RUSQ from 2012-18. He also writes for the NoveList database.

How to Translate the Data We Collect Into Stories

How to Translate the Data We Collect Into Stories

 

Collecting numbers, aka quantitative data, answers many questions regarding your library. How many people in your service area have library cards and how has that changed in the last five years? Are more or less senior citizens coming to events? Which nonfiction books are circulating the most?

But numbers don’t tell about the lonely teen discovering a safe haven to create graphic novels. Or the overwhelmed grandmother, now custodian of her toddler grandkids, finding respite and friendship during programs on Reading Readiness and parenting.

In this program, we’ll discuss:

• What makes a compelling library story
• Where to find the best story tellers of all ages and backgrounds
• How to engage your community’s or institution’s talent to put stories into pictures and videos
• How to keep your collection of stories fresh

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Original broadcast April 14, 2020 

 

Biography ~ Pat Wagner
Pat Wagner has been a library trainer and consultant since 1978. She also has a background in the performing, literary, and visual arts as a performance poet and storyteller, playwright, graphic designer, and writer of fantasy fiction. She grew up in a family of storytellers and is currently recording those stories and accompanying photos to share with family members across the globe.

Creating and Maintaining a Relevant and Diverse Graphic Novel Collection

Creating and Maintaining a Relevant and Diverse Graphic Novel Collection

How many graphic novels have you read in the past year?

Some of your patrons are in their local comic shop every Wednesday, when new individual issues are released. Total sales for graphic novels, individual comic issues, and digital comics topped $1.09 billion in 2018. Their popularity continues to increase with readers and publishers alike and they should have a prominent place in your collection. Every year, an increasing number of new, different, and diverse stories are being published, especially for kids. Fresh imprints from major publishers are finding new readers of all ages. The stories they contain range from superheroes to poignant and melancholic autobiographies. Graphic novels tell stories for almost everyone.

Get some answers to your questions – whether you have a dedicated graphic novel collection or you’re just becoming familiar with this fun and exciting format. We’ll take a look at where graphic novels began and their importance in the library, along with the different ways you can acquire and catalog them. You’ll get hints on how to maintain and keep your collection fresh and circulating, and learn about many useful tools that are available. I love graphic novels and want your collection to shine, whether you’ve read one in the past, or not!

We will go over:
A short history of graphic novels as a unique art form and how they promote learning and literacy
How to think outside the usual publisher/vendor box when purchasing and organizing your collection
Strategies to help manage your collection, including weeding and floating
Some great tools to work graphic novels into advisory and displays

Register here for the live webinar or to have early access to the recording when it becomes available – all in this place! No need to register in a separate place for recording access.

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Original broadcast March 19, 2020 

Biography ~ Erin Stachowiak
Erin has worked in the library field for over 13 years and earned her MLIS from San Jose State University in 2016. She is currently one of the Collection Librarians at Arapahoe Library District in Colorado and oversees the media, graphic novels, and electronic resource collections for their 9 branches. Erin has been on multiple panels discussing some of her favorite things like comics, films, RPGs and more at past Denver Pop Culture Cons. She can be found in her basement every Saturday night, playing a 15th level Tengu cleric that’s fighting to save the world.

Diverse Books: Something for Everyone

Diverse Books: Something for Everyone

 

There has been growing awareness of the need for more diverse books and publishings in recent years. Arguably, it’s one of the most pressing issues in children’s and young adult literature. But is it working? How diverse are your bookshelves? Join education professor and social justice advocate Leigh Ann Fish for a discussion of why diverse books matter, where to find them, and how they can be used to support children’s (and adult’s) deep thinking about diverse experiences, including (but not limited to) LGBTQIA, Native, people of color, gender, dis/ability, and ethnic, cultural, and religious minorities. This session is a must for librarians, teachers, administrators, and anyone who has or works with children.

Participants will explore:
How diverse books help young people view themselves and others;
Strategies to help evaluate and select high-quality diverse books;
Ways to support meaningful conversations about diverse books;
Resources to find books with diverse main characters written by diverse authors; and
Whether reading diverse books really can change the world in positive ways!

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Original broadcast August 29, 2019 

Biography ~ Leigh Ann Fish
Leigh Ann Fish is an assistant professor of Early Childhood Education at the University of Maine at Farmington. She holds a Ph.D. in Educational Administration/Curriculum and Cultural Studies from Miami University and served as a National Board Certified elementary teacher and K-12 Gifted & Talented Coordinator in Ohio. Her areas of scholarship include social justice/critical pedagogy, girlhood/gender studies, Reggio-inspired practices, nature-based education, and young children with gifts and talent.

20 Books to Recommend to Your Patrons (whether you have read them or not) and Why They Are Important

20 Books to Recommend to Your Patrons (whether you have read them or not) and Why They Are Important

 

 

This presentation will highlight twenty (or thereabouts) books of note that librarians should know about and feel confident recommending to their patrons. The list will include fiction, non-fiction, and even a couple of really important kids books. A wide variety of topics will be explored. Beyond the book titles, we will address the background of the authors, similar titles, and why these books matter. When you don’t have time to catch up on reading the classics, this presentation will bring these works into your personal book satchel. The presenters will also address “best books” lists and how to filter through them to help your patrons, and perhaps pique your own interest.

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Original broadcast August 1, 2019 

Biography ~ Anne Abate
Anne has worked in a wide variety of libraries and library-related organizations during her career. She is currently the owner of Library Discount Network, a business that negotiates with database vendors on behalf of library consortia and networks. The company also provides administrative and management support for nonprofit organizations.

Biography ~ George S. Maley
George S. Maley earned a BA in Political Science from Xavier University (1978) and read law at the University of Cincinnati (1981). He was called to the bar in 1981 and practiced law in Ohio for 38 years. In a purely autotelic pursuit at age 60, he decided to obtain a master’s degree in American History from Southern New Hampshire University (the Harvard of Southern New Hampshire). In earning this degree, he was named an outstanding student in the program earning a 4.0 grade point while being at least 30 years older than his classmates and instructors. His master’s thesis was a study of Jim Crow in a small Kentucky town.

Weeding 101: The How’s and Why’s of Deselecting as a Team

Weeding 101: The How’s and Why’s of Deselecting as a Team

Weeding, removing materials from the collection, is a fundamental part of making any library serve its community. Further, it’s a team effort! Everyone needs to understand the reasons and methodology behind deselecting materials.

With increasing demands for space, having an active physical collection is essential to serving your patrons. We will talk about the tricky, challenging problems of weeding as well as provide tips, tricks, and tools for evaluating your collection. Bring your questions, fears, or doubts!

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Original broadcast May 28, 2019

Biography ~ Karen Toonen
When Karen Toonen started as an Adult Services Librarian at the Naper Blvd. location of Naperville Public Library, withdrawing books made her depressed. But after years of seeing the benefits of a well-curated collection, especially in a small building, she ruthlessly weeds. Being a member of the Adult Reading Roundtable’s Steering Committee has also given her the opportunity to see how different libraries and library staff approach weeding. Her commitment to connecting customers with materials they enjoy and can utilize informs her weeding philosophy: Did it earn its shelf space? If not, out it goes!

Biography ~ Monica Minnick
Monica Minnick is a Children’s Librarian at the Naperville Public Library. Although she enjoys the variety her job entails, collection management is at the top of her list. She began her journey down the weeding rabbit hole 20 years ago, when as a young librarian, she was very hesitant about the whole weeding process. However, she quickly learned that it is a necessity to have a presentable collection and to increase circulation. She is known to be a ruthless weeder, many times to the chagrin of her coworkers.

Promoting Your Collections: Messaging, Merchandising, and More

Promoting Your Collections: Messaging, Merchandising, and More

 

Collections are the mainstays of libraries. After spending lots of money and time curating, processing, and making them available, you may think the work is done. But there’s one more vital step—promoting them! This webinar will help you go beyond basic book displays and posters.

Marketing maven Kathy Dempsey will help you understand why you should actually talk less about your library’s items and more about why they’re wonderful. She’ll share sample messages that illustrate the concept of “WIIFM” — What’s In It For Me? This webinar will also touch on content marketing, cross-promotion, and using social media effectively.

With the knowledge that you gain during this session, you’ll be ready to:

• Tie collections to activities and current events
• Use physical items to promote invisible, digital items
• Stop publicizing products, and instead, tout their benefits
• Promote collections outside of your buildings
• Use cross-promotion, alone or with partners, to share info efficiently

This session features many colorful images of great signage, merchandising, and social posts from libraries around the world to get your creative ideas flowing.

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Original broadcast April 23, 2019

Biography ~ Kathy Dempsey
Kathy Dempsey wrote the popular how-to tome The Accidental Library Marketer, and founded her own marketing consultancy, Libraries Are Essential (www.LibrariesAreEssential.com). Her work is dedicated to helping librarians and information professionals promote their value and expertise in order to gain respect and funding.

Kathy has been the Editor of Marketing Library Services newsletter for 22 years, and was formerly Editor-in-Chief of Computers in Libraries magazine. She’s an active member of the New Jersey Library Association, and Chair of the Library Marketing and Communications Conference (www.LibraryMarketingConference.org).

This writer, editor, and marketing maven has been giving presentations across the U.S. and Canada for 20 years, always sprinkling them with humor to make marketing concepts more interesting and accessible. She continues to fight the stereotypes that librarians are boring and that “”marketing”” is a dirty word.