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Personal Knowledge Management: Strategies and Tools

Personal Knowledge Management: Strategies and Tools

 
 

 

How do you stay on top of the deluge of information related to your job and professional development? And how do you make sense of this information, apply it to achieve your goals, and share it with others?

Personal knowledge management (PKM) offers a process to gather, organize, save, and use knowledge gained related to one’s work activities. PKM routines vary from person to person, yet all share a commitment to ongoing information gathering, sense making, and sharing that not only fuels one’s professional development but can foster connections and community with like-minded professionals.

Topics discussed in this program include:

• How to clarify your professional “learning” goals
• Analyzing your professional networks with these goals in mind
• Evaluating and curating the information you collect
• How to share and communicate your insight
• Putting it all together in your PKM practice

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Original broadcast September 16,2021 

Presenter: Mitchell Friedman
Mitchell Friedman, EdD, APR develops people. Known as an enthusiastic, energetic, and insightful educator and consultant, he relishes opportunities to help others to develop their skills and abilities on the path to achieving their full potential.
Dr. Friedman teaches leadership, management communication, organizational behavior, and public relations at universities located throughout the San Francisco Bay Area. Dr. Friedman also helps a range of organizations to develop the communications and leadership skills of their employees.

Bridging the Digital Divide – Lessons Learned During COVID

Bridging the Digital Divide – Lessons Learned During COVID

Is your library in a rural area? Are you serving a population with digital equity problems? Has everything gone digital but your region doesn’t have broadband access?

This informative program is designed to share ideas and projects for bridging the digital divide in response to the increased need for access to the internet during COVID-19. We will address such topics as digital equity, partnering with non-profits, virtual programming strategies, shifting collection development and technology needs, and other issues related to ensuring that library users are able to effectively access online resources and services.

As a result of this program, attendees will:
• Become more familiar with digital equity issues
• Become more familiar with resources available to ensure digital equity
• Best practices for providing increased digital equity

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Original broadcast September 7, 2021 

Presenter ~ June Power
June Power is the Director for Special Collections and Archives for The University of North Carolina at Pembroke, also having served 15 years as the head of the Access Services department. \n\nShe is the managing department head and has also assisted with copyright management, reference, and genealogy. She has presented at NCLA, the ILLiad Conference, the Ares Virtual Conference, the Azaela Coast Library Association Conference, and the Access Services Conference. She is on the editorial board for the Journal of Access Services and has published a series of articles in that journal as well as several book chapters.

How to Hire Better Bosses! How to Strengthen Your Management Recruitment Strategies

How to Hire Better Bosses! How to Strengthen Your Management Recruitment Strategies

A Gallup poll finds that organizations fail to choose the right candidate for leadership positions over 82% of the time. In terms of employee morale, exit interviews and workplace culture surveys show that toxic bosses are the number one reason employees leave or disengage from their organizations.
For the libraries that recruit better bosses tend to have healthier, happier organizations with more inclusive work environments. This program will help you to avoid common hiring mistakes and make the right hire the first time.
During this informative webinar, participants will learn:

 How to identify common management/supervisor/ leadership recruitment mistakes
 How to create “leadership vision statements” that will provide more focus and clarity to support long term strategic planning
 How to align your “leadership vision statements” with potential candidate interview questions

 
Original broadcast September 9, 2021 
 

Presenter; Elaina Norlin
Elaina Norlin is the Professional Development DEI Coordinator for the Association of Southeastern Research Libraries. She is an accomplished teacher, technology and leadership development trainer, and writer with extensive leadership experience and a flair for public relations, organizational development, marketing and persuasion and communications. Author of three books, she has delivered over 70 workshops, training sessions, presentations, and institutes both nationally and internationally on marketing, web usability design, facilitation, strategic influence, and conflict management. Her new book Six Step Guide to Library Worker Engagement (ALA) will be out July 2021. Elaina Norlin | ALA Store

Project Management Tools and Techniques for Libraries

Project Management Tools and Techniques for Libraries

 

 

The tools and techniques of Project Management are useful in all aspects of professional and personal life. This webinar introduces essential concepts and strategies for Project Management specifically aimed at their use in libraries.

Topics covered include the Project Management Life Cycle and what it means, management styles and their impact on managing projects, institutional issues, stakeholder management, scope definition, risk assessment and management, project planning tools, and team management.

There will be an emphasis on managing teams, including the role of the leader, communications tools and techniques, and meeting management. This webinar will be useful for both experienced and new project managers in the library setting. It will include a review of best practices in Project Management across a variety of industries.

By the end of the program attendees will learn:

• The history and major uses of Project Management in libraries as well as other industries
• How to identify the Project Management Life Cycle
• Useful Project Management tools and how to adapt them for use in libraries
• Where to go for additional information as well as training in Project Management

Original broadcast September 7, 2021 

Presenter: Anne Abate
Anne has worked in a wide variety of libraries and library-related organizations during her career. She is currently the owner of Library Discount Network, a business that negotiates with database vendors on behalf of library consortia and networks. The company also provides administrative and management support for nonprofit organizations.

Actively Anti-Racist Library Service to Leisure Readers: Foundations

Actively Anti-Racist Library Service to Leisure Readers: Foundations

Rank and file workers are the heartbeat of our Public Libraries. They are the ones serving the patrons, processing items, shelving the books, and answering all of the questions, from directional to those that can best be described as “unique.” They hold the day-to-day knowledge of what is actually happening at the library. And yet, they are the staff who are most left out from the decisions making. But how can you, the library worker, be more involved in your Library’s administrative processes without overstepping your organizational boundaries?

Come learn from a 20+ year library worker and Trustee, as we will walk through the basics of how the Board makes decisions and how you, the staff member, can be more active in the process.

As a result of this program, attendees will:

• Learn how you can positively interact with management and trustees to effect organization change
• Come away with an actionable list of how you can advocate for themselves within the larger organization
• Improve communication throughout your organization

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Original broadcast September 2, 2021

 
 
Presenter: Becky Spratford
Becky Spratford [MLIS] is a Readers’ Advisor in Illinois specializing in serving patrons ages 13 and up. She trains library staff all over the world on how to match books with readers through the local public library. She runs the critically acclaimed RA training blog RA for All. She is under contract to provide content forEBSCO’s NoveList database and writes reviews for Booklist and a horror review column for Library Journal. Becky is a 20 year locally elected Library Trustee [still serving] and a Board member for the Reaching Across Illinois Library System. Known for her work with horror readers, Becky is the author of The Reader’s Advisory Guide to Horror, Second Edition [ALA Editions, 2012] and is currently hard at work on the 3rd Edition. She is a proud member of the Horror Writers Association and currently serves as the Association’s Secretary and organizer of their annual Librarians’ Day. You can follow Becky on Twitter @RAforAll. 
 

 

Child Sex Trafficking Prevention: Information and Tools for Libraries

Child Sex Trafficking Prevention: Information and Tools for Libraries

 

What does child sex trafficking look like? Where does it happen online? What are the myths and realities? This program will discuss those myths and share statistics around child sex trafficking in the United States and share resources every library employee should know to help people when needed.

Attendees will learn about the risk factors in their communities of child victims and the protective factors which make children less likely to be targeted and victimized.

As a result of this program, attendees will learn:
• The definitions of child “grooming”
• The connection between online safety and child sex trafficking
• Where child sex trafficking is likely to happen
• Resources their libraries can offer to their users and how and where to report

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Original broadcast August 26, 2021 

Presenter: Carrie Rogers-Whitehead
Carrie Rogers-Whitehead worked in libraries for nearly a decade and now consults and trains librarians. She is the author of the 2021 RUSA-award winning Serving Teens and Adults on the Autism Spectrum: a Guide for Libraries. Carrie has also published other titles around technology and parenting and is co-authoring a new book out spring 2022: Teaching and Advocating Digital Citizenship: Tools for Librarians.

Carrie is the founder of Digital Respons-Ability, a mission-based company that educates students, parents and educators on digital citizenship. She lives in Utah with her family.

Volunteers in the Library: Coordinating Their Success

Volunteers in the Library: Coordinating Their Success

TBLC logo

Volunteering can certainly be an experience. Making a volunteer experience truly rewarding takes coordination and care. Learn about the best practices for recruiting, training and supervising volunteers in the library. Get tips and strategies for making the volunteer role beneficial for the volunteer and the organization. We will explore meaningful ways to inspire and celebrate your library volunteers.

Learning Objectives

  • Identify the volunteer role in libraries of all types
  • Discuss the library’s role in supervising volunteers
  • Utilize tools for identifying and coordinating types of volunteer projects
  • Examine new ways to celebrate volunteer contributions in your library

Presenter: Erin Gray
After earning her master’s degree in library science from the University of Missouri-Columbia, Erin went on to work in Branch Management, Collection Development and Youth Services for over a decade in public libraries. She is an advocate for all libraries and a past President of the Missouri Library Association. Erin enjoys facilitating continuing education classes of all types as a Library Services and Technology Trainer for Amigos Library Services.

 

 

 

In partnership with TBLC,  webinars originally presented to their membership can now be found and accessed through Florida Library Webinars.

If you have questions about a session, contact TBLC.

Why DEI Training is Not Working

Why DEI Training is Not Working

 

According to a McKinsey Report, organizations large and small spend an average of $8 billion dollars a year on diversity training. Nearly two-thirds of colleges and universities offer diversity trainings for faculty, staff, and students each year for an annual estimate of over 280 million dollars. Yet, racial trauma, bias incidents, and hate crimes on college campuses are on the continual rise.

Hundreds of studies dating back to the 1930s suggest that anti-bias and diversity training does not reduce bias, alter behavior, or change the cultural climate of the organization. Specifically, recent studies have shown that diversity training had “no positive effects,” fails on multiple levels and in numerous cited cases and lawsuits, creates more harm than good.

Although diversity training does not work, does not mean the problem cannot be solved. Libraries can go from popular “drive by” diversity training sessions to creating change that supports an inclusive workplace culture for everyone.

In this interactive presentation, participants will:

• Take a Workplace Agility IQ quiz
• Learn the Top 5 Reasons most diversity training fails to meet key objectives and goals
• Learn the #1 mistake almost every organization makes when starting a DEI program
• Learn common sense things to do before starting any DEI initiative

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Original broadcast August 12, 2021 

 

Presenter: Elaina Norlin
Elaina Norlin is the Professional Development DEI Coordinator for the Association of Southeastern Research Libraries. She is an accomplished teacher, technology and leadership development trainer, and writer with extensive leadership experience and a flair for public relations, organizational development, marketing and persuasion and communications. Author of three books, she has delivered over 70 workshops, training sessions, presentations, and institutes both nationally and internationally on marketing, web usability design, facilitation, strategic influence, and conflict management. Her new book Six Step Guide to Library Worker Engagement (ALA) will be out July 2021. Elaina Norlin | ALA Store

Peek Behind the Admin Curtain: Trustee Secrets All Library Staff Need To Know

Peek Behind the Admin Curtain: Trustee Secrets All Library Staff Need To Know

 
 

 

Rank and file workers are the heartbeat of our Public Libraries. They are the ones serving the patrons, processing items, shelving the books, and answering all of the questions, from directional to those that can best be described as “unique.” They hold the day-to-day knowledge of what is actually happening at the library. And yet, they are the staff who are most left out from the decisions making. But how can you, the library worker, be more involved in your Library’s administrative processes without overstepping your organizational boundaries? Come learn from a 20+ year library worker and Trustee, as we will walk through the basics of how the Board makes decisions and how you, the staff member, can be more active in the process.

Learning Objectives:
• Learn how you can positively interact with management and trustees to effect organization change
• Come away with an actionable list of how you can advocate for themselves within the larger organization
• Improve communication throughout your organization

Handout

Original broadcast August 5, 2021 

Presenter: Becky Spratford
Becky Spratford [MLIS] is a Readers’ Advisor in Illinois specializing in serving patrons ages 13 and up. She trains library staff all over the world on how to match books with readers through the local public library. She runs the critically acclaimed RA training blog RA for All. She is under contract to provide content for EBSCO’s NoveList database and writes reviews for Booklist and a horror review column for Library Journal. Becky is a 20 year locally elected Library Trustee [still serving] and a Board member for the Reaching Across Illinois Library System. Known for her work with horror readers, Becky is the author of The Reader’s Advisory Guide to Horror, Second Edition [ALA Editions, 2012] and is currently hard at work on the 3rd Edition. She is a proud member of the Horror Writers Association and currently serves as the Association’s Secretary and organizer of their annual Librarians’ Day. You can follow Becky on http://Twitter @RAforAll. 

Negotiations/Asking for a Raise

Negotiations/Asking for a Raise

 

Whether we’re starting a new job or working towards a promotion at our current one, we should be negotiating. Negotiation can be scary. But what’s even scarier is not doing it.
Ideally, we’d all get offered the salary we want and deserve, but if you’ve been working or job hunting for a while, you probably know that very few people receive a “perfect” offer right away.

Most of the time, we have to ask for what we want, build a case, and hope that the organization we’re negotiating with has the bandwidth to give us what we want or meet somewhere in the middle. This webinar will teach you how to prepare for a negotiation and it will equip you with tools for success.

As a result of this program, attendees will:
• Get into the right mindset
• Understand market value
• How to make your case
• Learn to talk about your accomplishments and how to tie it to their bottom line
• Exercises to help you relieve anxiety
• Understand biases and how to combat them

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Original broadcast July 29, 2021 

Presenter: Rachael Altman
Rachael believes that transferable skills, curiosity, passion, and mindfulness are the keys to success. She is a career coach, yoga teacher and meditation teacher, and jewelry maker. Her purpose is to inspire people to realize the value in their transferable skills and the fact that they can do anything with curiosity, creativity, and an open mind.

She has spent her career in market research and business development at Deloitte, Sidley Austin, and Deloitte and as an academic librarian at Rockford University and Alabama State University. Rachael currently works as a Market Research Analyst at G2, a tech company based in Chicago. You can connect on Instagram @itsrachaelaltman, by email at rachael.altman@gmail.com, and on LinkedIn.