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Getting to Know and Meeting the Needs of Generation Z

Getting to Know and Meeting the Needs of Generation Z

 

Born between 1997 and 2012, Generation Z is starting to come of age. Researchers are identifying defining traits of this generation that have a direct impact on library services, instruction, and programming. In this interactive and informative session, Lauren will share research findings on Generation Z and then apply the findings to the work we do in the library so that we meet the needs of this new group of young people.

Learning Outcomes:
• Attendees will be able to identify characteristics Generation Z
• Attendees will be able to describe how Generation Z differs from previous generations
• Attendees will be able to create library services, instruction, and programming tailored to Generation Z

Handout

Original broadcast June 13, 2019

Biography ~ Lauren Hays
Lauren Hays is the Instructional and Research Librarian at MidAmerica Nazarene University in Olathe, KS. Currently, she is in a doctoral program and expects to graduate in May 2018. Additionally, she is co-editing a book on the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) for academic librarians.
She is passionate about teaching and learning and desires to help librarians develop in their instructor/facilitator skills. More specifically, her professional interests include teaching, SoTL, information literacy, educational technology, Library and Information Science education, teacher identity, and faculty development. On a personal note, she loves dogs, traveling, and home.

More Than 20 Creative and Fun Ideas to Welcome and Delight Your Users in 60 Minutes

More Than 20 Creative and Fun Ideas to Welcome and Delight Your Users in 60 Minutes

 

 

Want to spice up your public or academic library with some creative ideas that not only look good, but could also save you time, lower your stress and bring some fun into your workplace?
Recently, powerfulmind.co published an article about some of the surprising things that forty-five public and academic libraries are doing to make their spaces more inviting and fun. In this interactive and informative webinar, Andrew Sanderbeck will share the best of the best and dig deeper into “why” some of these ideas might be a good fit for your library.
Expect to be delighted and amused by some of the creative things that other libraries are doing on their campuses and in their communities!

Original broadcast June 11, 2019

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Biography ~ Andrew Sanderbeck
Andrew has been developing and conducting training seminars for libraries and library organizations for more than twenty years. He has presented Web-based, On-line, and Face-to-Face sessions on Management and Leadership, Customer Service and Communication Skills in the U.S. and numerous countries around the world.

Developing an Outreach Program for Your Library

Developing an Outreach Program for Your Library

You have been assigned the task of creating an outreach plan for your library. Whether you have been in your position for a period of time or you are brand new to your library, this can be a momentous task. Where do you begin? How can you have the greatest impact?

In this interactive and informative program, we’ll discuss step by step suggestions and look at usual resources to guide you towards putting your plan into action.

At the end of this program, attendees will learn how to:
1. Identify resources to learn about your community
2. Develop your approach to different types of organizations and businesses in your community based on their needs
3. Identify ways to continue the relationships developed through outreach opportunities
4. Identify ways to bring those you interact with back to the library

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Original broadcast May 2, 2019 

Biography ~ Dana Bomba
Dana Bomba is a Public Services Librarian and Branch Manager for the Campbell County Public Library System in Central Virginia. Her primary focuses are daily branch operations, collection development, adult programming, and technology instruction. This is her first professional position in a library and she is grateful for the collaborative experiences she’s had so far!

I Spy: Intellectual Freedom Issues at Your Library

I Spy: Intellectual Freedom Issues at Your Library

Libraries have embraced technologies such as ILS, security cameras and social media, along with patron conveniences such as self-check out, open hold shelves, and Internet computers. But do these conveniences jeopardize our core value of patron privacy–the right to read and develop ideas free from unwanted surveillance?

Join Teresa Doherty and Rebecca Lamb, members of the Virginia Library Association’s Intellectual Freedom Committee, for a virtual tour through library spaces. They will help you identify and address privacy and intellectual freedom issues that may be part of your library’s services and practices.

Attendees will learn how to:

Identify privacy and intellectual freedom issues in library spaces, circulation systems, social media, and more
Implement best practices for Intellectual Freedom issues
Protect their institution with policies and procedures
Advocate for patron privacy within their institution

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Handout

Original broadcast February 19, 2019

Biography ~ Teresa Doherty
Teresa Doherty, MLIS, is the Assistant Head for Information Services and Teaching and Learning Librarian at Virginia Commonwealth University Libraries in Richmond, Virginia. She manages the main service point in a busy 24-hour library, teaches information literacy to undergrads, provides quality control of the libraries’ chat and text service, and tweets on behalf of James Branch Cabell Library. She was a member of American Library Association’s Intellectual Freedom Committee from 2008-2018 and currently organizes the Virginia Library Association’s annual Banned Books Week display contest.

Rebecca Lamb, MLA, MLIS, is the Adult Services Librarian at Waynesboro Public Library in Waynesboro, Virginia, and has more than twenty years experience in museums and both public and academic libraries. She became involved in IF after receiving the Freedom to Read Foundation’s Judith F. Krug Memorial Fund Scholarship to participate in their collaborative course on Intellectual Freedom & Censorship at the University of Illinois iSchool. Her IF low: censorship of the newspaper she edited in high school. Her IF high: winning the VLA Banned Books Week display contest–twice.

Our Public Library, Public School Partnership: The Power of YES

Our Public Library, Public School Partnership: The Power of YES

 

 

In Conneaut Ohio, our local public school asked us to help facilitate library services in the high school. We said yes. This “yes” is a far cry from our typical school “yes” of field trips, assemblies, and classroom collections.This “yes” included ILS, acquisitions management, training, delivery, grant writing, and so much more. Learn how much more by joining Kathy Pape for this program as she shares the successes and failures of this on-going process.Could your library say “yes” to more with the schools in your community?

Original broadcast January 15, 2018


Biography ~ Kathy Zappitello

Kathy has worked for fourteen years in Ohio libraries and is currently the Executive Director of the Conneaut Public Library in Conneaut, Ohio. Kathy also works as a producer, writer, actor, and director for one of Ohio’s cable access channels that provides programming to households in Ohio and Western Pennsylvania. Kathy is also a member of the Executive Board for The Association of Rural and Small Libraries.

Marketing Your Programs and Services to Millennials

Marketing Your Programs and Services to Millennials

Despite using the library more than generations before them, Millennials and Gen Z remain difficult to reach through traditional forms of library marketing. If they didn’t grow up in the library or have kids of their own, we probably aren’t seeing them in our buildings. As the demographics of our patrons change, so must the ways we communicate with them. So how do we reach this demographic in a way that won’t make them roll their eyes or throw our carefully crafted newsletters directly into the recycling bin?

Learn how to market your library’s programs and services to ages 18-35 through a combination of in-house marketing, social media, email newsletters, and branded content. This presentation will look at digital trends, the habits and interests of Millennials and Gen Z, and provide practical solutions to help libraries reach young adults.

Attendees will learn how to:
Identify where to focus marketing energies and resources to best reach Millennials and Gen Z
Create an eNewsletter unique to the 18-35 demographic
Understand the digital trends and social media use unique to each generation
Adjust tone in marketing based on audience and content
Utilize practical tips to springboard your marketing on social media and in physical spaces both within and outside of the library

Original broadcast October 20, 2018

Jez Layman ~ Biography
Jez Layman is an Adult Services Librarian in the west Chicago suburbs. When she’s not on the reference desk, she’s planning programs for 20-30somethings, creating reader’s advisory resources, or teaching classes on job hunting. She has a deep love for audiobooks and has a spreadsheet for every occasion.

 

Moving Your Services into Your Community

Moving Your Services into Your Community

 

We’ve heard the refrains of eliminating the reference desk, embedded librarians, and the like. We also hear of the need to get out into our communities. Yet meeting our community members where they are – not where we are – is still a challenge.
If we are free to move about our communities, and deliver services outside of the library, what might that look like? What innovative or imaginative twist can we use, which will spark the community’s attention and interaction? How can we assure that our efforts are accomplished in both safe and respectful ways?

After this webinar, participants will be able to:
Explain the value of moving services into your community
Propose activities which move the library out into it community
Consider safe and community needs in creating a safe space outside of the library

Handout

Moving Your Services- Suggested resource

Original broadcast October 23, 2018

Jill Hurst-Wahl ~ Biography
Jill Hurst-Wahl is consultant, speaker, writer, and educator. She is an associate professor of practice in Syracuse University’s School of Information Studies and the president of Hurst Associates, Ltd. She currently teaches graduate courses on collection development and on copyright. A former corporate librarian, Jill has always been an advocate for increasing the impact of libraries, no matter the type of community or organization they serve.

She is a member of the USNY Technology Policy and Practices Council and the Onondaga County Public Library Board of Trustees. Her interests include copyright, the use of social media, and the future of the profession. Jill blogs at Digitization101.com and can be found on Twitter at @Jill_HW.

Learning in the Library Through Experiences

Learning in the Library Through Experiences

Libraries are places where people engage in experiences, such as those created by makerspaces, storytime, gaming, and cooking classes. For library users to get the most out of these services and resources, underpinning the offerings with the theory of experiential learning is important. Developed by David A. Kolb, experiential learning consists of four parts that can be applied to any new program or service to help library users learn and grow.

In this interactive and informative program, Lauren will explain experiential learning and how it can apply in libraries. Attendees will leave the session with practical ideas for applying experiential learning in their day-to-day work.

After this webinar, participants will be able to:
Explore the theory of experiential learning
Identify ways to apply experiential learning in their library
Develop ideas for teaching through experiential learning

Handout

[pdf-embedder url=”https://floridalibrarywebinars.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/10.9.18-Learning-in-the-Library-Through-Experiences.pdf” title=”Handout “]

Original broadcast October 9, 2018 

Lauren Hay ~ Biography
Lauren Hays is the Instructional and Research Librarian at MidAmerica Nazarene University in Olathe, KS. Currently, she is in a doctoral program and expects to graduate in May 2018. Additionally, she is co-editing a book on the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) for academic librarians.

She is passionate about teaching and learning and desires to help librarians develop in their instructor/facilitator skills. More specifically, her professional interests include teaching, SoTL, information literacy, educational technology, Library and Information Science education, teacher identity, and faculty development. On a personal note, she loves dogs, traveling, and home.

The Future of Libraries: Exploring Lifelong Learning, Artificial  Intelligence, and Entrepreneurship Training

The Future of Libraries: Exploring Lifelong Learning, Artificial Intelligence, and Entrepreneurship Training

With lifelong learning at the center of much of what we foster in contemporary libraries, we can sometimes be overwhelmed by the flood of information about developments, trends, and challenges that help shape our possible futures. Without a grounding in rapidly-evolving topics including artificial intelligence and entrepreneurship training, we may find ourselves ill-prepared to serve library users face to face and online as that future continues to unfold.

This highly-interactive one-hour exploration of how recent developments in artificial intelligence, programs focused on developing entrepreneurial skills (particularly through library makerspaces), and learning initiatives overall will help us take advantage of those developments to continue creating a library of the future that meets our communities’ varied needs.

Participants, by the time they leave the session, will:
Have at least three resources that can be incorporated into strategic-planning efforts to help shape the library of the future
Be able to cite at least three current developments that are likely to have tremendous impacts on how the library of the future continues to develop
Have identified at least two concrete steps they will take within the next month to prepare themselves and their colleagues for the library of the future

Those interested in pre-session preparation for the discussions are encouraged to skim the following resources before attending the webinar:

“Library of the Future: Trends”
ALA Center for the Future of Libraries
http://www.ala.org/transforminglibraries/future/trends

“Emerging Technologies in Libraries: Artificial Intelligence”
Jason Griffey, The Aspen Institute, Posted on YouTube December 18, 2015
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y31FS-G790w
“Leadership Brief: Strengthening Libraries as Entrepreneurial Hubs”
Urban Libraries Council, 2018
https://www.urbanlibraries.org/assets/Leadership_Brief_Strengthening_Libraries_as_Entrepreneurial_Hubs.pdf

Handout

Original broadcast October 11, 2018

Paul Signorelli ~ Biography
Paul, author of the forthcoming Change the World Using Social Media (Rowman & Littlefield, winter/spring 2019) and co-author of Workplace Learning & Leadership with Lori Reed (ALA Editions, 2011), served as director of staff training for the San Francisco Public Library system before becoming an independent writer-trainer-presenter-consultant.

He collaborates with clients and colleagues to identify and work with current trends in ways that help them better serve members of the communities with which they work; served on New Media Consortium (NMC) Horizon Project expert panels identifying and documenting educational-technology developments, trends, and challenges in libraries and other learning organizations from 2010-2017 before becoming a founding partner in FOEcast (Future of Education forecast); is a member of the ALA Library & Information Technology Association (LITA); and writes extensively to document and promote ed-tech innovations.

He earned his MLIS through the University of North Texas online program, and remains active in training-teaching-learning through ALA and ATD (the Association for Talent Development) at a variety of levels.

Assuring Library Materials Can Be Used by Your Community

Assuring Library Materials Can Be Used by Your Community

Having materials in a library’s collection is good; having those materials in the formats needed by the library’s community is much better. The act of supplying content in the formats that community members require is critically important to meeting their information needs.
This informative webinar will delve into ways of discerning the format needs of a community, including using the census and other data, along with existing reports, to discern the best way of provisioning material for the community.

After this webinar, participants will be able to:

Explain the various ways content can be made accessible to members of a library’s community
Examine U.S. Census data and draw preliminary conclusions based on that data
Select data from other sources which will support an understanding of the community’s accessibility needs

[pdf-embedder url=”https://floridalibrarywebinars.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/9.18.18-Assuring-Library-Materials-Can-Be-Used.pdf” title=”Handout”]

[pdf-embedder url=”https://floridalibrarywebinars.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/Assuring-Library-Materials-Can-Be-Used-Suggested-Resources.pdf” title=”Handout”]

Original broadcast September 18, 2018 

Jill Hurst-Wahl ~ Biography
Jill Hurst-Wahl is consultant, speaker, writer, and educator. She is an associate professor of practice in Syracuse University’s School of Information Studies and the president of Hurst Associates, Ltd. She currently teaches graduate courses on collection development and on copyright. A former corporate librarian, Jill has always been an advocate for increasing the impact of libraries, no matter the type of community or organization they serve. She is a member of the USNY Technology Policy and Practices Council and the Onondaga County Public Library Board of Trustees.  Her interests include copyright, the use of social media, and the future of the profession. Jill blogs at Digitization101.com and can be found on Twitter at @Jill_HW.