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Marketing Your Programs and Services to Millennials

Marketing Your Programs and Services to Millennials

Despite using the library more than generations before them, Millennials and Gen Z remain difficult to reach through traditional forms of library marketing. If they didn’t grow up in the library or have kids of their own, we probably aren’t seeing them in our buildings. As the demographics of our patrons change, so must the ways we communicate with them. So how do we reach this demographic in a way that won’t make them roll their eyes or throw our carefully crafted newsletters directly into the recycling bin?

Learn how to market your library’s programs and services to ages 18-35 through a combination of in-house marketing, social media, email newsletters, and branded content. This presentation will look at digital trends, the habits and interests of Millennials and Gen Z, and provide practical solutions to help libraries reach young adults.

Attendees will learn how to:
Identify where to focus marketing energies and resources to best reach Millennials and Gen Z
Create an eNewsletter unique to the 18-35 demographic
Understand the digital trends and social media use unique to each generation
Adjust tone in marketing based on audience and content
Utilize practical tips to springboard your marketing on social media and in physical spaces both within and outside of the library

Original broadcast October 20, 2018

Jez Layman ~ Biography
Jez Layman is an Adult Services Librarian in the west Chicago suburbs. When she’s not on the reference desk, she’s planning programs for 20-30somethings, creating reader’s advisory resources, or teaching classes on job hunting. She has a deep love for audiobooks and has a spreadsheet for every occasion.

 

Moving Your Services into Your Community

Moving Your Services into Your Community

 

We’ve heard the refrains of eliminating the reference desk, embedded librarians, and the like. We also hear of the need to get out into our communities. Yet meeting our community members where they are – not where we are – is still a challenge.
If we are free to move about our communities, and deliver services outside of the library, what might that look like? What innovative or imaginative twist can we use, which will spark the community’s attention and interaction? How can we assure that our efforts are accomplished in both safe and respectful ways?

After this webinar, participants will be able to:
Explain the value of moving services into your community
Propose activities which move the library out into it community
Consider safe and community needs in creating a safe space outside of the library

Handout

Moving Your Services- Suggested resource

Original broadcast October 23, 2018

Jill Hurst-Wahl ~ Biography
Jill Hurst-Wahl is consultant, speaker, writer, and educator. She is an associate professor of practice in Syracuse University’s School of Information Studies and the president of Hurst Associates, Ltd. She currently teaches graduate courses on collection development and on copyright. A former corporate librarian, Jill has always been an advocate for increasing the impact of libraries, no matter the type of community or organization they serve.

She is a member of the USNY Technology Policy and Practices Council and the Onondaga County Public Library Board of Trustees. Her interests include copyright, the use of social media, and the future of the profession. Jill blogs at Digitization101.com and can be found on Twitter at @Jill_HW.

Learning in the Library Through Experiences

Learning in the Library Through Experiences

Libraries are places where people engage in experiences, such as those created by makerspaces, storytime, gaming, and cooking classes. For library users to get the most out of these services and resources, underpinning the offerings with the theory of experiential learning is important. Developed by David A. Kolb, experiential learning consists of four parts that can be applied to any new program or service to help library users learn and grow.

In this interactive and informative program, Lauren will explain experiential learning and how it can apply in libraries. Attendees will leave the session with practical ideas for applying experiential learning in their day-to-day work.

After this webinar, participants will be able to:
Explore the theory of experiential learning
Identify ways to apply experiential learning in their library
Develop ideas for teaching through experiential learning

Handout

[pdf-embedder url=”https://floridalibrarywebinars.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/10.9.18-Learning-in-the-Library-Through-Experiences.pdf” title=”Handout “]

Original broadcast October 9, 2018 

Lauren Hay ~ Biography
Lauren Hays is the Instructional and Research Librarian at MidAmerica Nazarene University in Olathe, KS. Currently, she is in a doctoral program and expects to graduate in May 2018. Additionally, she is co-editing a book on the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) for academic librarians.

She is passionate about teaching and learning and desires to help librarians develop in their instructor/facilitator skills. More specifically, her professional interests include teaching, SoTL, information literacy, educational technology, Library and Information Science education, teacher identity, and faculty development. On a personal note, she loves dogs, traveling, and home.

The Future of Libraries: Exploring Lifelong Learning, Artificial  Intelligence, and Entrepreneurship Training

The Future of Libraries: Exploring Lifelong Learning, Artificial Intelligence, and Entrepreneurship Training

With lifelong learning at the center of much of what we foster in contemporary libraries, we can sometimes be overwhelmed by the flood of information about developments, trends, and challenges that help shape our possible futures. Without a grounding in rapidly-evolving topics including artificial intelligence and entrepreneurship training, we may find ourselves ill-prepared to serve library users face to face and online as that future continues to unfold.

This highly-interactive one-hour exploration of how recent developments in artificial intelligence, programs focused on developing entrepreneurial skills (particularly through library makerspaces), and learning initiatives overall will help us take advantage of those developments to continue creating a library of the future that meets our communities’ varied needs.

Participants, by the time they leave the session, will:
Have at least three resources that can be incorporated into strategic-planning efforts to help shape the library of the future
Be able to cite at least three current developments that are likely to have tremendous impacts on how the library of the future continues to develop
Have identified at least two concrete steps they will take within the next month to prepare themselves and their colleagues for the library of the future

Those interested in pre-session preparation for the discussions are encouraged to skim the following resources before attending the webinar:

“Library of the Future: Trends”
ALA Center for the Future of Libraries
http://www.ala.org/transforminglibraries/future/trends

“Emerging Technologies in Libraries: Artificial Intelligence”
Jason Griffey, The Aspen Institute, Posted on YouTube December 18, 2015
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y31FS-G790w
“Leadership Brief: Strengthening Libraries as Entrepreneurial Hubs”
Urban Libraries Council, 2018
https://www.urbanlibraries.org/assets/Leadership_Brief_Strengthening_Libraries_as_Entrepreneurial_Hubs.pdf

Handout

Original broadcast October 11, 2018

Paul Signorelli ~ Biography
Paul, author of the forthcoming Change the World Using Social Media (Rowman & Littlefield, winter/spring 2019) and co-author of Workplace Learning & Leadership with Lori Reed (ALA Editions, 2011), served as director of staff training for the San Francisco Public Library system before becoming an independent writer-trainer-presenter-consultant.

He collaborates with clients and colleagues to identify and work with current trends in ways that help them better serve members of the communities with which they work; served on New Media Consortium (NMC) Horizon Project expert panels identifying and documenting educational-technology developments, trends, and challenges in libraries and other learning organizations from 2010-2017 before becoming a founding partner in FOEcast (Future of Education forecast); is a member of the ALA Library & Information Technology Association (LITA); and writes extensively to document and promote ed-tech innovations.

He earned his MLIS through the University of North Texas online program, and remains active in training-teaching-learning through ALA and ATD (the Association for Talent Development) at a variety of levels.

Assuring Library Materials Can Be Used by Your Community

Assuring Library Materials Can Be Used by Your Community

Having materials in a library’s collection is good; having those materials in the formats needed by the library’s community is much better. The act of supplying content in the formats that community members require is critically important to meeting their information needs.
This informative webinar will delve into ways of discerning the format needs of a community, including using the census and other data, along with existing reports, to discern the best way of provisioning material for the community.

After this webinar, participants will be able to:

Explain the various ways content can be made accessible to members of a library’s community
Examine U.S. Census data and draw preliminary conclusions based on that data
Select data from other sources which will support an understanding of the community’s accessibility needs

[pdf-embedder url=”https://floridalibrarywebinars.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/9.18.18-Assuring-Library-Materials-Can-Be-Used.pdf” title=”Handout”]

[pdf-embedder url=”https://floridalibrarywebinars.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/Assuring-Library-Materials-Can-Be-Used-Suggested-Resources.pdf” title=”Handout”]

Original broadcast September 18, 2018 

Jill Hurst-Wahl ~ Biography
Jill Hurst-Wahl is consultant, speaker, writer, and educator. She is an associate professor of practice in Syracuse University’s School of Information Studies and the president of Hurst Associates, Ltd. She currently teaches graduate courses on collection development and on copyright. A former corporate librarian, Jill has always been an advocate for increasing the impact of libraries, no matter the type of community or organization they serve. She is a member of the USNY Technology Policy and Practices Council and the Onondaga County Public Library Board of Trustees.  Her interests include copyright, the use of social media, and the future of the profession. Jill blogs at Digitization101.com and can be found on Twitter at @Jill_HW.

 

Helping Your Patrons with Identity Theft

Helping Your Patrons with Identity Theft

 

Do you have patrons that need help with identity theft? A recent report from Equifax stated that someone’s identity is now stolen every 2 seconds!

In this informative program learn more about IdentityTheft.gov, the federal government’s free, one-stop resource to help people fix problems caused by identity theft. It’s now easier for victims of identity theft to report it and recover from it. The site allows patrons to get a personal recovery plan that walks them through each step; update their personal plan and track their progress; and print pre-filled letters & forms to send to credit bureaus, businesses, and debt collectors

Find out what to steps your patrons can take if they suspect identity theft (whether it’s related to credit accounts, tax returns, minor children, or medical records) and how to spot imposter scams, a prevalent and evolving fraud that can lead to identity theft.

[pdf-embedder url=”https://floridalibrarywebinars.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/7.19.18-Helping-Your-Patrons-with-Identity-Theft.pdf” title=”Handout”]

Original broadcast July 19, 2018

Carol Kando-Pineda ~ Biography
Carol Kando-Pineda is Counsel in the FTC’s Division of Consumer and Business Education where she leads teams to create free print materials, websites, and videos to help people avoid scams, manage their money and make wise buys. Carol began her FTC career as a staff attorney bringing false advertising cases; she then became the agency’s Legislative Counsel, serving for several years as a liaison between the FTC and Congress.

 

A Design Thinking Approach to Encore Career Exploration:  Help Your 50+ Patrons (or Yourself) Discover the Next Act

A Design Thinking Approach to Encore Career Exploration: Help Your 50+ Patrons (or Yourself) Discover the Next Act

Your webinar will be held on June 26, 2018, 10:30 am – 11:30 am ET.

Login here: http://connectpro85922111.adobeconnect.com/rrecskscrbrb/

After the webinar, please complete our Training Survey and provide your feedback on the session. Within 7 days, the recording of this session will be available in our On-Demand section.

 

 


 

An Encore Career has been described as “a movement of millions of people who are using our passions, skills and decades of experience to make a difference in our communities and the world” (Marc Freedman CEO Encore.org). As library staff, it can be very rewarding to help your patrons or yourself on the challenging path of (re)imagining their “next act.”

In this interactive and informative program, we will explore how career trajectories have changed over the years; how to use “design thinking” and other strategies to navigate the career exploration processes; how to (re)discover one’s passions, while taking into consideration interests, priorities, and the marketable skills one possesses or might acquire; and how to harness new opportunities presented by the “sharing economy” and internship programs. We will also recognize what advantages baby boomers have over their younger counterparts in the exploration process.

While our focus will be on the older adults’ pursuit of choosing (new) career options, the ideas presented can be applied to career explorers of all ages.

At the end of this program, participants will:
Discover at least two career exploration approaches or strategies that you would suggest to your patrons or that might work for you.
Learn how to secure and conduct an informational interview (aka “prototype conversation”).
Recognize at least two myths about older workers, and two ways in which older workers have an advantage over their younger counterparts in the career exploration process.
Identify print, online and community-based resources that your patrons can use to explore encore career options.

Register here for the live webinar or to have early access to the recording when it becomes available – all in this place! No need to register in a separate place for recording access.


Hope Klein Levy ~ Biography

Hope Levy has twenty-plus years of experience in education and training, gerontology and career development. For the past 8 years Hope has been teaching classes at the San Francisco Public Library through a partnership with City College San Francisco’s Encore Learning Program. The common thread throughout her career is a passion for lifelong learning. Through her consulting practice, There’s Always Hope Consulting, Hope creates learning programs for older adults and the professionals who serve them. Hope holds an MA in Gerontology and an MA in Special Education, both from San Francisco State University.

 

Dealing with Opiate Users in the Library: From Behavior Management to Overdosers

Dealing with Opiate Users in the Library: From Behavior Management to Overdosers

In 2015, more Americans died from drug overdose than from car accidents and gun homicides combined, and more than six out of 10 of those overdoses involved an opioid. Preliminary data for 2016 suggests that drug overdose deaths for that year rose by about 19%—the largest annual increase the United States has ever seen. (American Libraries, June 2017)

In this interactive and informative program, Dr. Steve Albrecht will discuss the issues of dealing with opiate users in the library including safety, health, and security concerns.

By the end of the program, attendees will:
•Recognize the tremendous increase in opiate overdose problems in this country and why libraries are not immune to the issue.
•How to recognize opiate use abuse in patrons – from a legal and medical perspective.
•Know the differences between alcohol use, drug use, poly-drug use, and opiate drug use and withdrawal symptoms in patrons.
•Know when opiate use by patrons is a police issue versus a paramedic’s response.
•Discuss when and if Narcan use by library staff on opiate overdoes patrons may be a necessity.
•Deal with the safety hazards related to opiate users, their drugs, and drug paraphernalia, including needles.


[pdf-embedder url=”https://floridalibrarywebinars.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/6.7.18-Dealing-With-Opiates-1.pdf” title=”6.7.18 Dealing With Opiates (1)”]

Original broadcast June 7, 2018

Dr. Steve Albrecht – Biography
Dr. Steve Albrecht is one of the leading experts in the country on library security. His 2015 book, Library Security, was published by the ALA. He teaches workshops around the US to help library leaders and staff to deal with challenging and problematic patrons. He holds a doctoral degree in Business Administration, an MA in Security Management, a BS in Psychology, and an BA in English. He worked for the San Diego Police Department for 15 years and has written 18 books on police, security, and business subjects. He has been a member of the California Narcotics Officers Association for nearly 20 years.

 

 

Banned Books Week: NOW is the Time to Get Ready

Banned Books Week: NOW is the Time to Get Ready

 

 

Are you looking for some new ways to observe this annual library celebration? Kathy Barco will share ideas on how to promote Banned Books Week (September 23 – 29, 2018), including a variety of components to tailor a program suitable for teens and adults. Additionally, she will provide background on censorship, the Library Bill of Rights, and the Freedom to Read.

Very short book talks on books that have been banned or censored will also be included in this program, as well as a description of games based on banned book titles.

Attendees will also learn:
About some thought-provoking situations involving intellectual freedom encountered by librarians in a variety of library settings
How to use infographics and images from ALA and other sources
About several Top Ten Banned Books Lists
When to expect this year’s list

Handout

Handout

Original broadcast February 22, 2018

 

Biography ~ Kathy Barco
A former children’s librarian, Kathy recently retired from the position of Literacy Coordinator at ABC (Albuquerque/Bernalillo County) Library. Previously, Kathy was Youth Services Coordinator at the New Mexico State Library from 2001-2006.

Kathy’s accomplishments include:
Graduate of the School of Library and Information Science at the University of Southern Mississippi in Hattiesburg, MS
Recipient of the 2006 Leadership Award from the New Mexico Library Association
Author of READiscover New Mexico – A Tri-Lingual Adventure in Literacy – Sunstone Press, Santa Fe
Co-author (with Valerie Nye) of True Stories of Censorship Battles in America’s Libraries – ALA Editions; Breakfast New Mexico Style and Breakfast Santa Fe Style – Sunstone Press, Santa Fe

Serving Older Adult Patrons and Their Care Partners

By 2030, projections indicate that 25% of the US population will be 65 or older. This means that libraries will be serving a steadily increasing number of older patrons and their care partners. To help you understand and adapt to these patrons’ changing needs you’re invited to attend this interactive program.

In this informative program, you’ll experience an empathy-building aging simulation activity and we’ll also address biases on aging and how to communicate with older adults who are confused. You will also have the opportunity to recognize what you are already doing well, and learn how to hone your skills in meeting the unique needs of individual patrons in this age group.

Outcomes for this program include:

• Increasing your awareness and knowledge concerning various aspects of the aging process
• Developing empathy for older adults’ functional losses and related feelings
• Identifying at least one thing you are already doing well in meeting the needs of older adult patrons
(and their care partners), and one
action you can take to enhance the elder-friendly environment at your library

Join Hope Klein Levy for this fun and engaging professional development opportunity, which is likely to help you enhance service to the community, while improving your own job satisfaction.

Handout

Handout

Original broadcast October 5, 2017

Hope Klein Levy ~ Biography
Hope Levy has twenty-plus years of experience in education and training, gerontology and career development. For the past six years Hope has been teaching classes at the San Francisco Public Library through a partnership with City College San Francisco’s Encore Learning Program. Through her consulting practice, There’s Always Hope, she helps organizations develop and deliver learning programs that promote positive aging. The common thread throughout her career is a passion for lifelong learning. Hope holds an MA in Gerontology and an MA in Special Education, both from San Francisco State University.