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More Ways Your Library Can Partner With the Federal Trade Commission

More Ways Your Library Can Partner With the Federal Trade Commission

 

Libraries provide more advice and services to a broader array of people. Do you serve new arrivals or people with challenges reading English? What about teens or older people? Military families? Everyone is a consumer — and crooks use clever schemes to defraud millions of people every year. We also know that scammers target people from diverse communities in unique ways. FTC has free tools at FTC.gov/libraries, tailored for various audiences; they can help you help all your patrons. On this webinar, you’ll learn how to:
Create programming on consumer topics or incorporate consumer tips in your existing programs
Support patrons who experience identity theft by showing them how to start the recovery process using IdentityTheft.gov
Find short, actionable consumer content to share with your patrons on your social networks.

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Original broadcast August 13, 2019 

Biography ~ Carol Kando-Pineda
Carol Kando-Pineda is Counsel in the FTC’s Division of Consumer and Business Education where she leads teams to create free print materials, websites, and videos to help people avoid scams, manage their money and make wise buys. Carol began her FTC career as a staff attorney bringing false advertising cases; she then became the agency’s Legislative Counsel, serving for several years as a liaison between the FTC and Congress.

Memory Cafés and Libraries: How to Start and Sustain Dementia Inclusiveness in Library Settings

Memory Cafés and Libraries: How to Start and Sustain Dementia Inclusiveness in Library Settings

 

 

Memory cafés are proliferating around the world and in the U.S., many libraries have joined the memory café movement to give people having dementia and their care partner’s regular opportunities for socialization and enjoyable, meaningful, engaging activities.

This session will describe best practices for memory cafés in libraries based on experiences in Wisconsin and Massachusetts, two states with the most memory cafés.

As a result of attending this webinar, participants will gain knowledge about:

• What memory cafés are, how they got started in Europe, and why they’ve spread so quickly throughout the U.S.
• Best practices for launching and operating memory cafés
• Where to find helpful suggestions about memory café operations and activities

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Original broadcast August 15, 2019 


Biography ~ Susan McFadden

Susan McFadden retired as a Psychology Professor at University of Wisconsin Oshkosh in 2012 and co-founded Fox Valley Memory Project (FVMP; www.foxvalleymemoryproject.org) in northeast Wisconsin. She has traveled extensively learning about memory cafés and other programs and services to help people living with dementia and care partners live as well as possible. FVMP operates nine memory cafés each month; schedules can be found on the website. She and her husband co-authored Aging Together: Dementia, Friendship, and Flourishing Communities (2011, Johns Hopkins University Press) and she is currently writing a book about dementia-inclusive communities.

All About Audiobooks

All About Audiobooks

Discover why audiobooks have become so popular and how to best serve your patrons in a two-fold presentation. First, learn how to build a collection, utilize selection tools, and understand the unique traits that determine the quality of an audiobook, going beyond the words on the page. Then, learn how to help new and longtime listeners find their new favorite title or narrator(s), using “listen-alikes” and elements of style, tone, and editing.

Attendees will learn how to:
● Select audiobooks in a variety of formats by using journals, awards, print statistics, podcasts, and other selection tools
● Navigate the unique challenges of managing an audiobook collection, including working with multiple vendors
● Identify popular narrators and utilize professional resources
● Provide listener’s advisory to patrons and better market your collection
● Make your collection more accessible to a variety of listener types

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Original broadcast August 8, 2019

Biography ~ Jez Layman
Jez Layman is an Adult Services Librarian in the west Chicago suburbs. When she’s not on the reference desk, she’s planning programs for 20-30somethings, creating reader’s advisory resources, or teaching classes on job hunting. She has a deep love for audiobooks and has a readsheet for every occasion. You can find more on Jez at jezlayman.com

Adult Cooking Programs in the Library: Make it Happen

Adult Cooking Programs in the Library: Make it Happen

 

Eating together creates connections and fosters community. When aligned with the importance of promoting healthy living, it is only natural that the public library would provide classes in food preparation as part of a healthy lifestyle. The Maitland Public Library has been holding cooking demonstrations since 2008. Adult cooking programs range from cultural programs, special diets, and healthy options. Cooking classes are informative, delightful, and hugely popular with patrons. In this webinar, attendees will learn about this history of cooking classes at MPL, how to work with your organization to get approval, the types of cooking classes we hold, and how to facilitate them in your library.

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Original broadcast July 31, 2019 

Biography ~ Amber Downsmber 
Amber Downsmber Downs is the Manager of Public Services at the Maitland Public Library. She has been working in libraries since 2007 and received her MLIS from Florida State University in 2012. She has worked in both public and academic libraries and has spent time in both reference and youth services.

Biography ~ Rebecca Bramlett 
Rebecca Bramlett is the Public Services Librarian at the Maitland Public Library. She received her MLIS from Florida State University and her MA in Social Sciences from the University of Chicago. She has worked in public services in both Special Collections and public libraries, and currently oversees adult programing at the Maitland Public Library.

Attracting Today’s Volunteers to the Library

Attracting Today’s Volunteers to the Library

 

 

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Volunteerism is changing. Libraries now have the opportunity to engage highly skilled volunteers who can bring their unique expertise to bear on the library’s mission. Actual success stories of innovative library volunteer engagement will be shared.
Participants in this webinar will learn how to:
Identify what motivates today’s potential volunteers and how to find the right fit for their skills and interests
Make the best use of skilled volunteers at the library
Design meaningful jobs for volunteers and recruit the right candidates for them
Implement strategies for successful volunteer engagement, including gaining staff buy-in

Successfully deployed skilled volunteers can help gain community support for the library and attract more people to use and engage with it. Whether your library is large or small, this webinar will help you to revitalize library volunteerism and reap the benefits of increased community engagement.

Original broadcast July 25, 2019

Biography ~ Carla Lehn
Carla Lehn began her career as a VISTA volunteer, and after receiving a Masters in Community Development from the University of California, Davis, worked for United Way for over a decade. Before joining the California State Library staff in 2001 to work on statewide literacy, volunteerism and community engagement initiatives, she was a private consultant on volunteer engagement, board development, and community collaboration.
Carla’s most recent book: “From Library Volunteer to Library Advocate: Tapping Into the Power of Community Engagement” was published in June, 2018. Since her December 2015 retirement, Carla has returned to consulting and bucket list travel, and is an active volunteer.

Teaching Library Customers How To Manage Their Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter Information Streams

Teaching Library Customers How To Manage Their Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter Information Streams

Social media can be a useful tool for keeping in touch with family and friends, smart shopping, researching political ideas, planning vacations, and staying on top of emergency information from their local government. But too many library customers abandon social media because of fears of being hacked, of being vulnerable to online crime, or because they justifiably hate the noise of political diatribes, unseemly venting, phony news items, and various scams.

First, we will discuss why a rewarding online experience starts with ensuring the library customer’s devices’ operating systems and applications are made safe and kept up-to-date. (This also applies to your library’s computers, of course.) Then we will discuss three popular sites, Twitter, Facebook®, and LinkedIn®, and how to help your library customer experience the best results from each while avoiding typical pitfalls.

This session will include the following topics:
– Why there are no guarantees when managing online risks
– Computer jargon worth learning
– The basics of ensuring their computers are protected
– Keeping browsers and applications up-to-date
– Password protocols: the good, the bad, and the silly
– Preventing identity theft and malware “infections”
– Customizing links, followers, and content
– Blocking unwanted link, followers, and content
– What to avoid doing online
– Social media benefits
– Site strengths and weaknesses
– Mistakes library trainers make

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Original broadcast July 10, 2019 

Biography ~ Pat Wagner
Pat Wagner has been a trainer and consultant for libraries since 1978 using e-mail, platforms, and now social media to serve clients across the United States (and the solar system) who she has never met face-to-face.. She presents at state and national library conferences as well as working with libraries of all types from Alaska to Florida. She has been a frequent visitor to Florida libraries and was a facilitator for the Sunshine State Library Leadership Institute for several years. Pat focuses on skills needed to support better productivity and workplace relationships, from personnel issues to strategic planning. She is known for her practical and good-humored programs.

Getting to Know and Meeting the Needs of Generation Z

Getting to Know and Meeting the Needs of Generation Z

 

Born between 1997 and 2012, Generation Z is starting to come of age. Researchers are identifying defining traits of this generation that have a direct impact on library services, instruction, and programming. In this interactive and informative session, Lauren will share research findings on Generation Z and then apply the findings to the work we do in the library so that we meet the needs of this new group of young people.

Learning Outcomes:
• Attendees will be able to identify characteristics Generation Z
• Attendees will be able to describe how Generation Z differs from previous generations
• Attendees will be able to create library services, instruction, and programming tailored to Generation Z

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Original broadcast June 13, 2019

Biography ~ Lauren Hays
Lauren Hays is the Instructional and Research Librarian at MidAmerica Nazarene University in Olathe, KS. Currently, she is in a doctoral program and expects to graduate in May 2018. Additionally, she is co-editing a book on the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) for academic librarians.
She is passionate about teaching and learning and desires to help librarians develop in their instructor/facilitator skills. More specifically, her professional interests include teaching, SoTL, information literacy, educational technology, Library and Information Science education, teacher identity, and faculty development. On a personal note, she loves dogs, traveling, and home.

More Than 20 Creative and Fun Ideas to Welcome and Delight Your Users in 60 Minutes

More Than 20 Creative and Fun Ideas to Welcome and Delight Your Users in 60 Minutes

 

 

Want to spice up your public or academic library with some creative ideas that not only look good, but could also save you time, lower your stress and bring some fun into your workplace?
Recently, powerfulmind.co published an article about some of the surprising things that forty-five public and academic libraries are doing to make their spaces more inviting and fun. In this interactive and informative webinar, Andrew Sanderbeck will share the best of the best and dig deeper into “why” some of these ideas might be a good fit for your library.
Expect to be delighted and amused by some of the creative things that other libraries are doing on their campuses and in their communities!

Original broadcast June 11, 2019

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Biography ~ Andrew Sanderbeck
Andrew has been developing and conducting training seminars for libraries and library organizations for more than twenty years. He has presented Web-based, On-line, and Face-to-Face sessions on Management and Leadership, Customer Service and Communication Skills in the U.S. and numerous countries around the world.

Developing an Outreach Program for Your Library

Developing an Outreach Program for Your Library

You have been assigned the task of creating an outreach plan for your library. Whether you have been in your position for a period of time or you are brand new to your library, this can be a momentous task. Where do you begin? How can you have the greatest impact?

In this interactive and informative program, we’ll discuss step by step suggestions and look at usual resources to guide you towards putting your plan into action.

At the end of this program, attendees will learn how to:
1. Identify resources to learn about your community
2. Develop your approach to different types of organizations and businesses in your community based on their needs
3. Identify ways to continue the relationships developed through outreach opportunities
4. Identify ways to bring those you interact with back to the library

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Original broadcast May 2, 2019 

Biography ~ Dana Bomba
Dana Bomba is a Public Services Librarian and Branch Manager for the Campbell County Public Library System in Central Virginia. Her primary focuses are daily branch operations, collection development, adult programming, and technology instruction. This is her first professional position in a library and she is grateful for the collaborative experiences she’s had so far!

I Spy: Intellectual Freedom Issues at Your Library

I Spy: Intellectual Freedom Issues at Your Library

Libraries have embraced technologies such as ILS, security cameras and social media, along with patron conveniences such as self-check out, open hold shelves, and Internet computers. But do these conveniences jeopardize our core value of patron privacy–the right to read and develop ideas free from unwanted surveillance?

Join Teresa Doherty and Rebecca Lamb, members of the Virginia Library Association’s Intellectual Freedom Committee, for a virtual tour through library spaces. They will help you identify and address privacy and intellectual freedom issues that may be part of your library’s services and practices.

Attendees will learn how to:

Identify privacy and intellectual freedom issues in library spaces, circulation systems, social media, and more
Implement best practices for Intellectual Freedom issues
Protect their institution with policies and procedures
Advocate for patron privacy within their institution

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Original broadcast February 19, 2019

Biography ~ Teresa Doherty
Teresa Doherty, MLIS, is the Assistant Head for Information Services and Teaching and Learning Librarian at Virginia Commonwealth University Libraries in Richmond, Virginia. She manages the main service point in a busy 24-hour library, teaches information literacy to undergrads, provides quality control of the libraries’ chat and text service, and tweets on behalf of James Branch Cabell Library. She was a member of American Library Association’s Intellectual Freedom Committee from 2008-2018 and currently organizes the Virginia Library Association’s annual Banned Books Week display contest.

Rebecca Lamb, MLA, MLIS, is the Adult Services Librarian at Waynesboro Public Library in Waynesboro, Virginia, and has more than twenty years experience in museums and both public and academic libraries. She became involved in IF after receiving the Freedom to Read Foundation’s Judith F. Krug Memorial Fund Scholarship to participate in their collaborative course on Intellectual Freedom & Censorship at the University of Illinois iSchool. Her IF low: censorship of the newspaper she edited in high school. Her IF high: winning the VLA Banned Books Week display contest–twice.