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Circulating Non-Traditional Items: One Library’s Success Story

Circulating Non-Traditional Items: One Library’s Success Story

 

Are non-traditional items a good fit for your library? More and more libraries are joining the fun by adding items such as telescopes, GoPro cameras, and ukuleles to their library’s collection. A little over two years ago, Springville Public Library purchased a number of these items, branded them as “Discovery Kits”, and set out to enhance our patron’s learning experience. What started out as a collection of 24 kits has nearly doubled in size since then, generating a number of great stories and community connections along the way.

Join Springville Public Library director Dan Mickelson as he discusses the steps Springville Library took to roll out “Discovery Kits” and how they have been received by the community.

Attendees will:

● Understand why discovery kits might be a good addition to their collection
● Understand the challenges these items present
● Review a list of popular discovery kits items
● Discuss the steps to prepare the collection for circulation

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Original broadcast March 5, 2020 

Biography ~ Dan Mickelson
Dan Mickelson received his Master of Library and Information Science degree from Clarion University of Pennsylvania. Dan has been in library management for over ten years and currently serves as Library Director of Springville Public Library in Springville, Utah. Springville Public Library serves a population of 34,000 citizens in a growing community 45 minutes outside of Salt Lake City. It has been named Utah’s “Best of State” for five years running, with acknowledgment of stellar service to the community. Outside of the library, Dan enjoys hiking and biking and spending time with his twin 6 year old girls.

Bring on the Carnival Fun: Creating Large-Scale Community Programming

Bring on the Carnival Fun: Creating Large-Scale Community Programming

 

Libraries are increasingly becoming hubs for community play and engagement. But, do we really have what it takes to create a large scale community program that is both free to the public and a celebration of our library users? In this interactive and informative program, we’ll explore strategies for planning a community carnival, creating a planning team that involves community members, and executing this type of event. Snippets of past carnivals will be revealed, as well. Challenges and future opportunities will be discussed.

As a result of this program, participants will learn:
• How to create a planning team, and the planning process
• Strategies for creating this type of program at no cost to the library user, while being budget friendly for the library
• Strategies for creating community partnerships, including offering community members a seat on the planning team

Why this type of program is important:
The current trend in libraries is to create experiences for library users that often face barriers that prohibit them from the experience. In doing so, libraries are spending money to provide free programs on a smaller scale. But, a community carnival is an opportunity to have a broader impact, and to involve overlooked community partners and resources. This type of program does not have to be budget busting either. It is possible to create a large-scale program for the whole community without charging for any of it.

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Original broadcast February 13, 2020

Biography: April Watkins
April has worked with children in some capacity her entire adult life, including six years as a high school journalism teacher, and three years as a Children’s Librarian. She can regularly be seen rocking rainbow knee-high socks, tulle skirts, blue hair, and pigtails as she embodies her childhood heroes, Rainbow Bright and Punky Brewster. She loves scrapbooking, alternative music, dystopian YA novels, and binge-watching. April has a BS in Education from Bowling Green State University and a MA in Library and Information Sciences from the University of South Florida. She currently serves as the Early Childhood Services Senior Librarian for Suffolk Public Library where she has started a city-wide reading initiatives, and transformed the way SPL conducts Early Literacy Outreach. She lives in Smithfield, VA with her husband, two sons, and their very large St. Bernard.

How to Coordinate Popular Author Events at Your Library

How to Coordinate Popular Author Events at Your Library

 

Want to learn how to coordinate popular author event by creating a memorable experience for your author and attendees? This webinar is for you! This program will give you tools including Mj’s Author VIP Form to gather unique details about the author before his or her appearance. (Downloadable form will be available.)

Then, you will learn to use Mj Callaway’s easy-to-implement marketing formula, Author Countdown, to generate event interest. Hear how to kick off a pre-event meet & greet with VIPs.

We will also discuss why and how partnering with clubs, organizations, and associations take your event to the next level. In this webinar wrap-up, you’ll discover the Top Ten Event Suggestions from Popular Authors.

<strong>Participants in this webinar will:</strong>
• Get the five must-haves for successful author events
• Eliminate avoidable snafus attendees and authors have experienced
• Add fun to the occasion using creative ideas other authors incorporated

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Original broadcast February 4, 2020

Biography ~ Mj Calloway
As a former corporate sales trainer and only award-winning woman sales executive to rank #1 nationally, Mj knows first-hand the disruptions professionals, managers, and executive teams handle daily. Yet, they still need to be positive and productive.
She blends her experiences together, sales, speaking and journalism, to create interactive and impactful workshops. With more than 2,000 articles published in consumer magazines, she’s interviewed hundreds of people from youth entrepreneurs to CEOs to non-profit founders to professional athletes. She has a unique ability to make others feel like they’re talking to a friend.
Mj has earned Professional Member designation from National Speakers Associations (NSA), and she’s the current Co-President of NSA Pittsburgh.

Revitalize Your Friends of the Library by Understanding Today’s Volunteers

Revitalize Your Friends of the Library by Understanding Today’s Volunteers

Volunteer service is a valuable strategy for community engagement, but traditional volunteer programs in libraries of all sizes need to be redesigned to work with today’s volunteers – many of whom have limited time to give and expect to have their expertise put to good use. Join us and learn how to engage and harness the power of skilled volunteers with talents ranging from graphic design and public relations to event planning and leadership.

By the end of this session, participants will be able to:
Identify current trends that require a shift in traditional volunteer management practices
Inventory their organization’s needs that can be met by the expertise and skills of new volunteers
Design effective job descriptions establishing explicit expectations of training, investment of time, and clearly delineated tasks
Prepare an achievable recruitment plan to locate skilled volunteers to meet the organization’s needs

 

Original broadcast January 23, 2020
Biography ~ Carla Lehn

Carla Lehn began her career as a VISTA volunteer, and after receiving a Masters in Community Development from the University of California, Davis, worked for United Way for over a decade.  Before joining the California State Library staff in 2001 to work on statewide literacy, volunteerism and community engagement initiatives, she was a private consultant on volunteer engagement, board development, and community collaboration. Carla’s most recent book: “From Library Volunteer to Library Advocate: Tapping Into the Power of Community Engagement” was published in June, 2018.  Since her December 2015 retirement, Carla has returned to consulting and bucket list travel, and is an active volunteer.

Intermediate Genealogy: Census Records

Intermediate Genealogy: Census Records

Every beginning genealogist knows that Federal Census records are a great place to start searching for our ancestors. However, we can learn more from them than just the places, dates, and names listed.
Knowing the history and historical importance of data collected by census records is an important tool in every genealogist’s kit. Gleaning information not indexed in a database can lead to big breakthroughs in your research.
Learn how to sift through and interpret enumerator’s abbreviations as well as your ancestor’s historical data.

At the conclusion of webinar, participants will know:
● How and where to access census records
● The history and historical importance of census records for genealogical research
● The type of data collected and how it relates to genealogy
● The differences and similarities of local census records
● Introductory knowledge about European census records

Original broadcast December 19, 2019 

Biography ~ Maggie Rose
Maggie Rose is a librarian at the Twinsburg Public Library in Ohio. She coordinates the library book displays and is responsible for the audio book and board games collections. Maggie also teaches computer classes and sits on the Reference and Information Services Division and Adult Services Division Action Councils for the Ohio Library Council.
Maggie started library work in 5th grade as a shelver and volunteer in her school library. As a teen, she started shelving in her local public library and has held many library positions since. Maggie graduated summa cum laude from the University of Akron with a BA in English and minor in classical studies. She received her MLIS from Kent State and has been working as a librarian for six years.
Maggie loves gardening, camping and her boisterous family, which consists of a spouse, a boy, a girl, a dog, 6 cats, and 9 chickens.

The Healing Library

The Healing Library

This session will introduce participants to The Healing Library (THL) – lendable kits of healing for families who have experienced trauma. The free resources to create these kits include the following topics: The Death of a Loved One, The Death of a Pet, Separation & Divorce, and Alzheimer’s & Your Family.
In addition to discussing these free resources, we’ll also touch on how they can benefit your community through Social Emotional Learning. Finally, we’ll talk about how to scale a kit’s size to work for any library lending setup.

We’ll cover:
What is THL and who is creating these resources
What’s included in each kit
Brief overview of Social Emotional Learning
Examples of how kits support Social Emotional Learning
Topics available as free downloads
Kits currently available for sale
Making it work in any library
Grant language available on our website

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Original broadcast December 12, 2019 

Biography ~ Megan Emery
Megan Emery has been working in public libraries for over 13 years in three states; most recently as Experience Designer & Coordinator for the Chattanooga Public Library’s 4th Floor Maker Space and Teen Department. She’s the author of Cooking Up Library Programs Teens & Tweens Will Love: Recipes for Success and a two time winner of the YALSA’s Writing Award. When she’s not geeking out over library stuff you can find her dancing with her new baby, sneaking treats to her dog and cat, or cooking yummy stuff to share with her husband.

Comparing DNA Test Results From 23andMe, AncestryDNA, and FamilyTreeDNA

Comparing DNA Test Results From 23andMe, AncestryDNA, and FamilyTreeDNA

 

 

Personal DNA tests are wildly popular, but how accurate are they? Librarian Emily Correa shows you her results from three online DNA test providers, as well as a controversial DNA data aggregator. See how they differ, what special tools they offer, and an overall review of their services. We will also discuss privacy concerns.

In this interactive and informative program, attendees will learn:
– How these platforms extract genealogical data
– The privacy issues related to your genetic material
– How to use multiple platforms (including FamilySearch and GEDMatch) to connect with family members

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Original broadcast November 21, 2019 

 

Biography ~ Emily Correa
Emily Correa is a Public Services Librarian for Campbell County Public Library System, VA. She has been involved in various committees and leadership with the Virginia Library Association, the Mid-Atlantic Library Alliance, and the County of Campbell. For more information, contact her at emilycorrea583@gmail.com

24 Adult Programming Ideas in 60 Minutes

24 Adult Programming Ideas in 60 Minutes

 

 

Jump start your program planning with new ideas or variations on tried and true favorites in this rapid fire webinar. You don’t need expensive equipment or lots of extra staff to run these events. From easy to complex, for larger or smaller libraries, find ideas for diverse audiences here.

Amy Alessio brings twenty years of teen and adult programming experience to practical and humorous webinars filled with ideas of what to do -and not to do – when planning. In addition to timely and themed program ideas, she will offer several ideas that can be adapted to almost any theme. Fill your next how-to fest or your planning calendar with new, interactive events for adults, millennials, seniors and families.

Attendees can expect to:
• Leave with several new, practical ideas that won’t break the library budget
• Discover that they are doing several wonderful programs already that can be tweaked into new ideas and
series of events.
• Work with difficult themes or large cooperative festivals armed with patron favorite events.

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Original broadcast November 12, 2019 

Biography ~ Amy Alessio
Amy Alessio is an award-winning librarian with a black belt in karate. Her latest book is the co-authored of Pop Culture Inspired Programs (American Library Association, 2018). She was a member of the YALSA Board of Directors and was awarded the Illinois Library Association’s first Young Adult Librarian Award. Her fiction includes the Amazon bestselling Alana O’Neill mysteries with vintage recipes, and romance under another pen name. She teaches graduate-level young adult literature, collection development and webinars on book trends and social media. She is a romance reviewer for Booklist. Learn more at www.amyalessio.com.

Beyond Fake News: Strategies for Evaluating Information in an Era of “Alternative Facts”

Beyond Fake News: Strategies for Evaluating Information in an Era of “Alternative Facts”

 

 

In our new world of fake news and “alternative facts”, teaching students how to navigate and evaluate information is challenging. Join us to learn about the right combination of tools to teach students essential information literacy skills so they can evaluate sources and find authoritative content for their research needs. We will also discuss how to teach students about the consequences of disinformation so that they will be motivated to avoid it in their school work and personal lives.

Specifically, attendees will learn:
· Concrete, student-relatable examples of how disinformation can harm
· Instructions for how to use the “IF I APPLY” framework to help students identify and move past their
emotions and biases with regard to research topics
· Methods involved in lateral reading—reading “around” a source to determine if it is reliable

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Original broadcast November 7, 2019 

Biography ~ Henrietta Verma
Henrietta (Etta) Verma, a librarian and author of the Credo IL Strategy Handbook and of Reviews are In: Read Write, and Expand Your Career (Mission Bell Media, 2016), is Credo’s Customer Success Manager. She previously worked at public libraries, where one of her favorite tasks was helping elderly patrons learn to use email, and at an academic institution, where she developed IL curricula and taught science and engineering undergrads to find reliable research materials. Etta then worked for years as an editor at School Library Journal and Library Journal. These days, as well as helping Credo’s customers to get the most out of their subscriptions, Etta corrals two children and two cats, and reads mystery novels in the few minutes per week that are left. She can be contacted at henrietta.verma@credoreference.com and @ettaverma on Twitter.

 

Tried and True: Ideas Ready to Use from Utah Libraries

Tried and True: Ideas Ready to Use from Utah Libraries

 

Get a glimpse of some unique projects happening in Utah Libraries. Five librarians will take ten minutes each to show you the success of new programs at their libraries. Providing library access to the most remote locations with book lockers. Fine free and library users are loving it. Taking library services anywhere with a book bike. Community adventure kits are lending equipment to access adventures. Room to grow: community gardens at the library.

Explore unique ideas that are ready to be implemented in any size library
See the pros and cons of unique program attempts

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Original broadcast October 29, 2019 

Biography ~ Dan Comptonan
Dan Compton grew up in Green River, Wyoming. He earned his B.S. in Social Science from Westminster College in 2004 and his M.L.S. from the University of North Texas in 2008. He began working as a part-time Library Clerk for the Summit County Library in 2005 and became the Director in 2011. He’s been fortunate to work on 2 new libraries for Summit County: Coalville in 2012 and Kamas Valley in 2018.
Jami is the Director of Tooele City Library (UT) and served as the President of Utah Library Association (2016-2017). She and her library’s leadership team are the creators of Self-Directed Achievement – an organizational model for individualized staff learning.

Biography ~ Carrie Valdes

Carrie Valdes has been the Director of the Grand County Public Library in Moab, UT since 2007 although she has worked for the library for almost 20 years. She has an MLS from the University of North Texas and a Bachelor’s in Human Resources. She has lived in Utah all her life (except for a brief stint in Mexico) and is passionate about reducing institutional barriers to library access for all community members.

Biography ~ Emma Wilson
Emma Wilson is the Community Garden Coordinator of The Plot for the City Library in Salt Lake City, Utah. She works with the Wasatch Community Gardens Leadership Network to provide a learning laboratory for library patrons to sow, grow, and share using sustainable gardening practices.

Biography ~ Dona Gay
Dona Gay is the Director of the Payson City Library in Payson, Utah.