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Online Market Research Resources: Census.gov and More

Online Market Research Resources: Census.gov and More

Developing a new strategic plan? Tracking changes in the make-up of the people in your community: numbers, age, socioeconomic status? Reviewing the local job market? Looking for trends in business, government, climate, and culture? Identifying neighborhoods that harbor populations that need assistance. Wanting to know where to build your next library branch?

Online market research offers almost too many choices when it comes to tracking information. Learn some common pitfalls when you are using “second-hand” data, check out sites everyone needs to know about, and find resources specifically for library planning and research.

Outcomes:
– Learn and apply strategies for verifying information.
– Use national studies to establish baselines for comparison.
– Know when it is better to go out and kick the tires yourself.

Slides

Original broadcast July 15, 2020

Biography ~ Pat Wagner
Pat Wagner has been a trainer and consultant for libraries since 1978 using e-mail, platforms, and now social media to serve clients across the United States (and the solar system) who she has never met face-to-face.. She presents at state and national library conferences as well as working with libraries of all types from Alaska to Florida. She has been a frequent visitor to Florida libraries and was a facilitator for the Sunshine State Library Leadership Institute for several years. Pat focuses on skills needed to support better productivity and workplace relationships, from personnel issues to strategic planning. She is known for her practical and good-humored programs.

Ready Reference: More than Google

Ready Reference: More than Google

 

Have you ever caught yourself answering every reference question with a simple Google search? Do your patrons expect you to have their answers as fast as you can type? Information is on-demand and at nearly all our fingertips and what makes libraries special is the quality of information they provide.
Learn about still useful print resources as well as handy websites to build your arsenal of answers without relying on Google, Siri, or Alexa. This webinar will help you identify credible online information and give you’re the tools to be ready for any reference question.

At the conclusion of webinar, participants will know:

● Useful print resources to keep at the reference desk
● How to evaluate an online source for credible information
● Why building a catalog of reference resources is important
● Techniques for taking getting the correct answer instead of the fast answer

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Original broadcast March 3, 2020

Biography ~ Maggie Rose
Maggie Rose is a librarian at the Twinsburg Public Library in Ohio. She coordinates the library book displays and is responsible for the audio book and board games collections. Maggie also teaches computer classes and sits on the Reference and Information Services Division and Adult Services Division Action Councils for the Ohio Library Council.

Comparing DNA Test Results From 23andMe, AncestryDNA, and FamilyTreeDNA

Comparing DNA Test Results From 23andMe, AncestryDNA, and FamilyTreeDNA

 

 

Personal DNA tests are wildly popular, but how accurate are they? Librarian Emily Correa shows you her results from three online DNA test providers, as well as a controversial DNA data aggregator. See how they differ, what special tools they offer, and an overall review of their services. We will also discuss privacy concerns.

In this interactive and informative program, attendees will learn:
– How these platforms extract genealogical data
– The privacy issues related to your genetic material
– How to use multiple platforms (including FamilySearch and GEDMatch) to connect with family members

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Original broadcast November 21, 2019 

 

Biography ~ Emily Correa
Emily Correa is a Public Services Librarian for Campbell County Public Library System, VA. She has been involved in various committees and leadership with the Virginia Library Association, the Mid-Atlantic Library Alliance, and the County of Campbell. For more information, contact her at emilycorrea583@gmail.com

ClinicalTrials.gov: Results Reporting, Unique Evidence, and the Role of Medical Librarians

ClinicalTrials.gov: Results Reporting, Unique Evidence, and the Role of Medical Librarians

PLAN Logo

ClinicalTrials.gov is the openly available federal registry and results database of publicly and privately funded clinical studies conducted in the United States and around the world. ClinicalTrials.gov is a vital resource for researchers, healthcare providers, and health sciences librarians who wish to consult the entire body of evidence on any particular topic.

Participants will be able to:

  • Learn about the significance of ClinicalTrials.gov
  • Search and interpret the results database Be informed about the number of study records with results, and
  • Learn how health sciences librarians can advocate to clinical researchers the importance of complying with the results submission requirements mandated by federal law.

Presenter:
Liz Waltman coordinates National Network of Libraries of Medicine SEA programming for Health and Health Information Professionals, the SEA Communications program and supports NNLM SEA’s engagement throughout the region. She is a graduate from the University of Pittsburgh where she earned a Masters in Library and Information Sciences. During her time in the program, she served as the Health Sciences Librarian Intern at Duquesne University. A main responsibility in this role was creating online guides to research topics in the health sciences including Complementary and Alternative Medicine, Music Therapy, and Human Trafficking. Prior to librarianship, Liz earned a B.A. in music education and performance from Ithaca College and a M.M. in music performance from the San Francisco Conservatory of Music. Outside the library Liz enjoys music on the bass trombone, baking her way through Mary Berry recipes, and binging on British television shows.

In partnership with PLAN,  webinars originally presented to their membership can now be found and accessed through Florida Library Webinars.

If you have questions about a session, contact PLAN.

Comparing DNA Test Results From 23andMe, AncestryDNA, and FamilyTreeDNA

From Genealogy to Genetics: Library Programming to Explore Your Roots

Are you patrons asking about DNA Testing? Expand upon your ability to help patrons explore their roots. This informative webinar with Margot Malachowski and Catherine Martin from the National Network of Libraries of Medicine offers ideas for free and easy family medical history programming, including opportunities for patrons to learn the basics of genetics. 

Learn about free resources including Genetics Home Reference, a consumer-friendly website about genetics and human health and the All of Us program from the National Institutes of Health.

This program is for you if you are looking to go beyond your current programs in genealogy and/or if you are answering reference questions about genealogy and genetics.

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Original broadcast July 9, 2019 

Biography ~ Margot Malachowski
Margot Malachowski is an Education & Outreach Coordinator for the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, New England Region. She provides training and support for educators, librarians, consumers and community organizations. Margot worked as a medical librarian for Baystate Health from 2008-2016. Prior to that, she worked in public libraries in Massachusetts and North Carolina. She has written articles and book chapters on hospital collaborations with public libraries, libraries and the Affordable Care Act, and searching for reliable integrative medicine information.

Biography ~ Catherine L. Martin, M.Ed.
Catherine L. Martin, M.Ed., CHIS currently is the Community Engagement Network Coordinator for the NIH National Network Librarians of Medicine, New England Region’s All of Us Research Program. She holds an M.Ed. with a major in Health Education and minor in Non-profit management. She received a Health Literacy Certification from the Tufts University School of Medicine Health Literacy Leadership Institute, June 2018. The NNLM courses including Genealogy to Genetics; Beyond an Apple a Day: Providing Consumer Health Information at Your Library and at the Medical Library Association she co-taught Precision Medicine.

Academic Libraries and Community (Non-University) Patrons

Academic Libraries and Community (Non-University) Patrons

 

While providing research services and physical infrastructure for students and faculty, academic libraries in many locations also are increasingly collaborative with their external communities. The academic library not only serves students and faculty but also community patrons who live and work close to the university within the same city and region.  

This informative webinar will provide community engagement examples of collaborative programming, relationships with local public libraries, K-12 institutions, and community colleges, and do’s and don’ts of a community outreach program. In an increasingly interconnected and global society, such collaborative relationships are an important tool for any successful academic librarian.

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Original broadcast May 14, 2019 

Biography ~ June Power
June Power is the Access Services/Reference Librarian for The University of North Carolina at Pembroke, managing circulation, course reserves, document delivery services, and copyright management. She is the managing department head and has also assisted with archival and special collections work, and genealogy. She has taught American Library Association e-courses on genealogical research and is working on her certification through the Board of Genealogical Certification. She has presented at NCLA, the ILLiad Conference, the Ares Virtual Conference, the Azaela Coast Library Association Conference, and the Access Services Conference. She is on the editorial board for the Journal of Access Services and has published a series of articles in that journal as well as several book chapters.

Beginning Genealogy: Free Resources

Beginning Genealogy: Free Resources

Where do we come from? Researching our family history is becoming more popular with subscription services such as Ancestry.com and 23andMe ancestry kits. But what if we don’t want to spend a fortune answering this question? How can we find our ancestors without costly subscriptions? How can I confirm that my ancestors were from (insert country) or that the stories my great aunt tells are true?
Knowing about free genealogy resources, both digital and physical, is one way to get started researching your genealogy. We all have a history and lack of funds should not be a barrier.
Familiarize yourself with free websites and databases as well as local resources so that you can research your own history, help a patron research, or conduct a class on genealogy.

At the conclusion of webinar, participants will be able to:
● Generate a list of geographic specific resources
● Locate hidden resources buried in databases
● Interpret Census records
● Evaluate digital resources
● Record your research

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Original broadcast April 30, 2019 


Biography ~ Maggie Rose

Maggie Rose is a librarian at the Twinsburg Public Library in Ohio. She coordinates the library book displays and is responsible for the audio book and board games collections. Maggie also teaches computer classes and sits on the Reference and Information Services Division and Adult Services Division Action Councils for the Ohio Library Council.
Maggie started library work in 5th grade as a shelver and volunteer in her school library. As a teen, she started shelving in her local public library and has held many library positions since. Maggie graduated summa cum laude from the University of Akron with a BA in English and minor in classical studies. She received her MLIS from Kent State and has been working as a librarian for six years.
Maggie loves gardening, camping and her boisterous family, which consists of a spouse, a boy, a girl, a dog, 5 cats, and 9 chickens.

Beginning Genealogy: Free Resources

Digging Up Your Roots: An Introduction to Genealogical Resear

Are you curious about your personal or family ancestry? Have you done a DNA test and want to know more about your roots? Do you work in a field where you get genealogical questions and want to be able to better assist your customers? Do you just enjoy historical research?

Even before the popularity of DNA testing, family history is something many people want to learn more about. However, many individuals find it is difficult to know exactly where to begin to trace their roots. While there is a plethora of information available at one’s fingertips, getting started and then sifting through the information overload to find those nuggets of information is often frustrating. Fortunately, there are many available resources that can help you to avoid that frustration and begin digging up your ancestral roots.

At the conclusion of the webinar, participants will be able to:
Know how to get organized for genealogical research
Gain familiarity with basic genealogical research tools
Gain familiarity with basic sources of genealogical information
Gain familiarity with sources of genealogical information for historically disenfranchised populations
Understand how DNA results and genealogical research intersect

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Original broadcast December 13, 2018

June Power ~ Biography
June Power is the Access Services/Reference Librarian for The University of North Carolina at Pembroke, managing circulation, course reserves, document delivery services, and copyright management. She is the managing department head and has also assisted with archival and special collections work, and genealogy. She has taught American Library Association e-courses on genealogical research and is working on her certification through the Board of Genealogical Certification. She has presented at NCLA, the ILLiad Conference, the Ares Virtual Conference, the Azaela Coast Library Association Conference, and the Access Services Conference. She is on the editorial board for the Journal of Access Services and has published a series of articles in that journal as well as several book chapters.

June works at the only university established as a state-sponsored school for Native Americans in the United States. She lives in Robeson County, NC, which is still the home of the Lumbee Tribe, with her husband, daughter, and a tribe of cats.

 

City Directories – Uncovering Clues About Your Community

City Directories – Uncovering Clues About Your Community

 

Genealogists are a special breed‐‐and their appetite for information sometimes feels endless. No reference is too obscure, no tombstone too faded. Join us to learn about an often‐overlooked resource to use when gathering information for family or local histories‐‐city directories. These directories help patrons locate information about people, organizations, and neighborhoods between the census decades and after 1940.

Explore the wealth of information in city directories
Access city directories online and in print
Utilize directories to understand growth of cities and communities
Supplement census information with city directory entries
Compile House Histories

Today, many of these resources are online. Even so, we’ll look at examples of paper and digital city directories to uncover clues about the past and present including how neighborhoods changed, who else lived in a house, when streets changed their names, and even tricks to determine when a spouse died.

 

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Original broadcast October 18, 2018

Miriam Kahn ~ Biography
MBK CONSULTING was founded by Miriam Kahn, MLS, MA, PhD in 1991. Her company specializes in providing consulting and educational services to libraries, archives, historical societies, museums and other cultural institutions. http://www.mbkcons.com

In 1992, Miriam began teaching workshops in Library & Information Science at Kent State University. These workshops continue to be popular today and include Genealogy & Local History Research Methods, Accessing Government Documents: Print & On-Line.

 

Beyond Booktalking: Whole Library Promotion

Beyond Booktalking: Whole Library Promotion

Every library employee has heard someone say they didn’t know the library offered something, whether it’s technology, programs, notary services, or any of the dozens of things we provide on a daily basis. Libraries can better spread the word when they realize that promotion and advocacy aren’t secluded to the marketing staff, but is part of everyone’s job.

Learn how to engage your staff at all levels and prepare them with the tools to “booktalk” your library and services to boost access, circulation, & attendance.

At the end of this program, attendees will be able to:
• Basic booktalking skills to get staff at all service points providing reader’s advisory
• Creatively think about underserved groups to market programs and services to a wider audience
• Keep your staff up to date on what is happening outside of their own department
• How to comfortably work promotion and library advocacy into conversation with patrons

[pdf-embedder url=”https://floridalibrarywebinars.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/6.19.18-Beyond-Booktalking.pdf” title=”6.19.18 Beyond Booktalking”]

Original broadcast June 19, 2017

Jez Layman — Biography
Jez Layman is an Adult Services Librarian at Indian Prairie Public Library in Darien, IL. When she’s not on the reference desk, she’s planning programs for 20-30 somethings for IPPL’s popular #LibSocial group or teaching classes on job hunting. She has a deep love for audiobooks and has a spreadsheet for every occasion.