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FHSLA /TBLC Mental Health Awareness

FHSLA /TBLC Mental Health Awareness

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No one is immune from the toxic stress caused by the COVID-19 public health crisis. Learn about resources to build resilience to the stressors of daily life, especially during the past year of quarantine and physical distancing, and to better manage your mental health.
 
 
 
Presenter: Ardis Hanson, PhD, MLS, AHIP
Ardis is Assistant Director for Research and Education at the USF Health Libraries and has over 25 years of experience in behavioral health research services and policy. As the former director of the Louis de la Parte Florida Mental Health Institute (FMHI) Research Library, she worked extensively with consumers, family members, and advocates to improve mental health services and patient outcomes.
 
Presenter: Olivia Dileonardo
Olivia DiLeonardo is a Medical Librarian and Narrative Medicine Instructor at Nemours Children’s Hospital and University of Central Florida College of Medicine, where she has led Narrative Medicine instruction for medical students, residents, and faculty since 2014. Olivia holds a Certificate of Professional Achievement in Narrative Medicine from Columbia University.

In partnership with TBLC,  webinars originally presented to their membership can now be found and accessed through Florida Library Webinars.

If you have questions about a session, contact TBLC.

A Ready Reference Refresher

A Ready Reference Refresher

 

Ready Reference Service is reference service finished or replied in a very short time in a minute if possible. It is an important reference service and it is related to such information that is provided directly to the patron in a short period of time. It also includes such reference services which direct the readers to reference sources immediately.

Are you ready for a ready reference update?

Attend this reference refresher and learn more about:
• free reliable sources used by other librarians
• online reference interviewing
• handy websites for basic information
• information for job hunters
• educational material for families and teachers
• an in-depth look at government resources
• ways to keep track of websites and resources

Handout

Original broadcast April 13, 2021 

Presenter ~ Kira Smith

Kira Smith currently works at TBLC as a virtual reference provider for Ask A Librarian and helps coordinate the statewide delivery service. She has a Master’s Degree in Library Science and Education. Kira is a former elementary school teacher and childbirth educator. She has lived in New York, Louisiana, Texas, and Florida. She enjoys teaching, technology, and travel.

FHSLA /TBLC Mental Health Awareness

FHSLA /TBLC National Autism Awareness Month

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April is World Autism Month and National Autism Awareness Month. Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), a neurological and developmental disorder, becomes observable in early childhood and impacts the person throughout their life. With a range of symptoms, how can parents, caregivers, family members, teachers, and community members learn about ASD? Please join us for this session to discuss reliable health-related resources that can assist in understanding and advocating for individuals with ASD.

Slides

Adult Employment: Office of Disability Employment Policy: U.S. Department of Labor

Youth Services Programming: Center for Autism & Related Disabilities (CARD) at USF

Presenter: Mary Katherine (Mary-Kate) Haver
Mary Katherine (Mary-Kate) Haver is the Medical Librarian for the Biomedical Library at H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute in Tampa. With over ten years of experience in medical librarianship, her professional experience includes working with allied health students, faculty, as well as adult and pediatric clinical staff, patients, their parents and caregivers. Mary-Kate is a Distinguished Member in the Academy of Health Information Professionals (AHIP) of the Medical Library Association (MLA) and holds Level II Specialization in Consumer Health (CHIS).

 

In partnership with TBLC,  webinars originally presented to their membership can now be found and accessed through Florida Library Webinars.

If you have questions about a session, contact TBLC.

How I Learned to Prevent the Curse of Misinformation and Think Critically in Today’s Information Age

How I Learned to Prevent the Curse of Misinformation and Think Critically in Today’s Information Age

By 2025, according to the World Economic Forum, it is estimated that 463 exabytes of data will be created globally every single day, which is equivalent to 212,765,957 DVDs! With this unbelievably massive daily torrent of information hitting us from multiple perspectives, it is impossible to process it all; and, more importantly, for us to “separate the wheat from the chaff.” It is vital for everyone to be able to verify the accuracy and authority of information found on the Web while being able to detect bad data and lies to achieve the ultimate goal of making intelligent decisions. As 21st Century library and information professionals, it is essential that we know how to find facts in a post-truth world, to critically think in the Information Age, and to be able to pass this skill on to our users.

In this webinar:
– Discover what misinformation and fake news is and explore ways to combat it.
– Learn to recognize misleading news, statistics, graphs, infographics, and more.
– Understand basic fallacies and how to detect bias.
– Appreciate how fast information spreads on social media and gather tools to help you become a stronger digital citizen.
– Utilize the scientific method to become a critical thinker in the Information Age.

Slides

Original broadcast March 17, 2021

Presenter ~Chad Mairn
Chad Mairn is an Information Services Librarian, Assistant Professor, and manages the Innovation Lab at St. Petersburg College.

While an undergraduate studying Humanities at the University of South Florida (USF), Chad was awarded a Library of Congress Fellowship archiving Leonard Bernstein’s personal papers. During his Library and Information Science (LIS) graduate work, also at USF, Chad became a technology liaison between the Bill Gates Learning Foundation and Florida public libraries.

Chad also plays drums in two bands: Low Season and It Will Flood.

FHSLA /TBLC Mental Health Awareness

Conducting the Reference Interview: How to Ask Better Questions to Make Customers Happy

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“Do you have any books on law?”

“I need information on bats.”

Have customers ever asked you general or ambiguous questions like these? How do we connect customers with exactly what they need when the way they ask for something is open to many interpretations?

Enter… the reference interview! The purpose of a reference interview is to find out what a customer wants so library staff can match their information need with the library’s resources.

Join us as we break down the process into simple steps and discuss solutions to common problems. Participants will leave with a 6-step tool kit to asking better questions so customers leave happy.

This class is intended to give an introduction and basic overview of the reference interview. The class is aimed at front-line staff and librarians who want a refresher.

Presenter: Stacey Grijalva is a librarian at the Denver Public Library, responsible for finding answers ranging from food assistance during the pandemic to what to read next to. She never grew out of asking “why” but has since learned better questions. She previously worked for the University of Maryland.

Presenter: Robin Filipczak is a reference librarian at the Denver Public Library and an adjunct professor in the University of Denver LIS program. She recognizes the transformative potential between a question and an answer she is privileged to work in that space.

In partnership with TBLC,  webinars originally presented to their membership can now be found and accessed through Florida Library Webinars.

If you have questions about a session, contact TBLC.

Beyond Ancestry.com: Online Genealogy Resources for Beginners

Beyond Ancestry.com: Online Genealogy Resources for Beginners

 

Are you planning to track down information online about your family history? Do you have users coming in asking for a good starting place? The good news is that thousands of digitized records from hundreds of sources have become available online to aid researchers in building their family tree. And new sources and records are being added every day to accessible databases. The challenging news is that there are thousands of digitized records online. The bad news? The information, gathered from court records, newspapers, passenger lists, census records, and historical society collections, can be fraught with errors and eccentricities.

Why do your grandmother records have seven different spellings of her first name?
Why can’t you find your aunt Peggy’s birth certificate?
Why can’t you find the record of your mom’s entry into the United States?
And what do you do when you find four men named Nathaniel Payne within three generations of brothers and fathers? And previous amateur researchers have reproduced mistakes in their own records and shared the errors until they became the new canon, so that dates and places are applied to the wrong Nats?

Based on 45 years’ experience, here are expert tips for getting started researching your family’s history, including tricks for verifying contradictory information (aka “family confabulations”), record-keeping, creating your own digital records, free versus fee-based sites, the debate about online DNA, finding lost but living “twigs and branches”, and building a family team.

Outcomes
– Record those family stories today. Don’t wait.
– Build your own databases of family information.
– Share family stories, documents, and photos digitally for future generations.
– Accept that family stories have power, but that does not mean they are accurate.

 
 
Original broadcast November 25, 2020 


Presenter ~ Pat Wagner

Pat Wagner has been a trainer and consultant for libraries since 1978 using e-mail, platforms, and now social media to serve clients across the United States (and the solar system) who she has never met face-to-face.. She presents at state and national library conferences as well as working with libraries of all types from Alaska to Florida. She has been a frequent visitor to Florida libraries and was a facilitator for the Sunshine State Library Leadership Institute for several years. Pat focuses on skills needed to support better productivity and workplace relationships, from personnel issues to strategic planning. She is known for her practical and good-humored programs.

Online Market Research Resources: Census.gov and More

Online Market Research Resources: Census.gov and More

Developing a new strategic plan? Tracking changes in the make-up of the people in your community: numbers, age, socioeconomic status? Reviewing the local job market? Looking for trends in business, government, climate, and culture? Identifying neighborhoods that harbor populations that need assistance. Wanting to know where to build your next library branch?

Online market research offers almost too many choices when it comes to tracking information. Learn some common pitfalls when you are using “second-hand” data, check out sites everyone needs to know about, and find resources specifically for library planning and research.

Outcomes:
– Learn and apply strategies for verifying information.
– Use national studies to establish baselines for comparison.
– Know when it is better to go out and kick the tires yourself.

Slides

Original broadcast July 15, 2020

Biography ~ Pat Wagner
Pat Wagner has been a trainer and consultant for libraries since 1978 using e-mail, platforms, and now social media to serve clients across the United States (and the solar system) who she has never met face-to-face.. She presents at state and national library conferences as well as working with libraries of all types from Alaska to Florida. She has been a frequent visitor to Florida libraries and was a facilitator for the Sunshine State Library Leadership Institute for several years. Pat focuses on skills needed to support better productivity and workplace relationships, from personnel issues to strategic planning. She is known for her practical and good-humored programs.

Ready Reference: More than Google

Ready Reference: More than Google

 

Have you ever caught yourself answering every reference question with a simple Google search? Do your patrons expect you to have their answers as fast as you can type? Information is on-demand and at nearly all our fingertips and what makes libraries special is the quality of information they provide.
Learn about still useful print resources as well as handy websites to build your arsenal of answers without relying on Google, Siri, or Alexa. This webinar will help you identify credible online information and give you’re the tools to be ready for any reference question.

At the conclusion of webinar, participants will know:

● Useful print resources to keep at the reference desk
● How to evaluate an online source for credible information
● Why building a catalog of reference resources is important
● Techniques for taking getting the correct answer instead of the fast answer

Handout

Original broadcast March 3, 2020

Biography ~ Maggie Rose
Maggie Rose is a librarian at the Twinsburg Public Library in Ohio. She coordinates the library book displays and is responsible for the audio book and board games collections. Maggie also teaches computer classes and sits on the Reference and Information Services Division and Adult Services Division Action Councils for the Ohio Library Council.

Comparing DNA Test Results From 23andMe, AncestryDNA, and FamilyTreeDNA

Comparing DNA Test Results From 23andMe, AncestryDNA, and FamilyTreeDNA

 

 

Personal DNA tests are wildly popular, but how accurate are they? Librarian Emily Correa shows you her results from three online DNA test providers, as well as a controversial DNA data aggregator. See how they differ, what special tools they offer, and an overall review of their services. We will also discuss privacy concerns.

In this interactive and informative program, attendees will learn:
– How these platforms extract genealogical data
– The privacy issues related to your genetic material
– How to use multiple platforms (including FamilySearch and GEDMatch) to connect with family members

Handout

Original broadcast November 21, 2019 

 

Biography ~ Emily Correa
Emily Correa is a Public Services Librarian for Campbell County Public Library System, VA. She has been involved in various committees and leadership with the Virginia Library Association, the Mid-Atlantic Library Alliance, and the County of Campbell. For more information, contact her at emilycorrea583@gmail.com

ClinicalTrials.gov: Results Reporting, Unique Evidence, and the Role of Medical Librarians

ClinicalTrials.gov: Results Reporting, Unique Evidence, and the Role of Medical Librarians

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ClinicalTrials.gov is the openly available federal registry and results database of publicly and privately funded clinical studies conducted in the United States and around the world. ClinicalTrials.gov is a vital resource for researchers, healthcare providers, and health sciences librarians who wish to consult the entire body of evidence on any particular topic.

Participants will be able to:

  • Learn about the significance of ClinicalTrials.gov
  • Search and interpret the results database Be informed about the number of study records with results, and
  • Learn how health sciences librarians can advocate to clinical researchers the importance of complying with the results submission requirements mandated by federal law.

Presenter:
Liz Waltman coordinates National Network of Libraries of Medicine SEA programming for Health and Health Information Professionals, the SEA Communications program and supports NNLM SEA’s engagement throughout the region. She is a graduate from the University of Pittsburgh where she earned a Masters in Library and Information Sciences. During her time in the program, she served as the Health Sciences Librarian Intern at Duquesne University. A main responsibility in this role was creating online guides to research topics in the health sciences including Complementary and Alternative Medicine, Music Therapy, and Human Trafficking. Prior to librarianship, Liz earned a B.A. in music education and performance from Ithaca College and a M.M. in music performance from the San Francisco Conservatory of Music. Outside the library Liz enjoys music on the bass trombone, baking her way through Mary Berry recipes, and binging on British television shows.

In partnership with PLAN,  webinars originally presented to their membership can now be found and accessed through Florida Library Webinars.

If you have questions about a session, contact PLAN.