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From Genealogy to Genetics: Library Programming to Explore Your Roots

From Genealogy to Genetics: Library Programming to Explore Your Roots

Are you patrons asking about DNA Testing? Expand upon your ability to help patrons explore their roots. This informative webinar with Margot Malachowski and Catherine Martin from the National Network of Libraries of Medicine offers ideas for free and easy family medical history programming, including opportunities for patrons to learn the basics of genetics. 

Learn about free resources including Genetics Home Reference, a consumer-friendly website about genetics and human health and the All of Us program from the National Institutes of Health.

This program is for you if you are looking to go beyond your current programs in genealogy and/or if you are answering reference questions about genealogy and genetics.

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Original broadcast July 9, 2019 

Biography ~ Margot Malachowski
Margot Malachowski is an Education & Outreach Coordinator for the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, New England Region. She provides training and support for educators, librarians, consumers and community organizations. Margot worked as a medical librarian for Baystate Health from 2008-2016. Prior to that, she worked in public libraries in Massachusetts and North Carolina. She has written articles and book chapters on hospital collaborations with public libraries, libraries and the Affordable Care Act, and searching for reliable integrative medicine information.

Biography ~ Catherine L. Martin, M.Ed.
Catherine L. Martin, M.Ed., CHIS currently is the Community Engagement Network Coordinator for the NIH National Network Librarians of Medicine, New England Region’s All of Us Research Program. She holds an M.Ed. with a major in Health Education and minor in Non-profit management. She received a Health Literacy Certification from the Tufts University School of Medicine Health Literacy Leadership Institute, June 2018. The NNLM courses including Genealogy to Genetics; Beyond an Apple a Day: Providing Consumer Health Information at Your Library and at the Medical Library Association she co-taught Precision Medicine.

Academic Libraries and Community (Non-University) Patrons

Academic Libraries and Community (Non-University) Patrons

 

While providing research services and physical infrastructure for students and faculty, academic libraries in many locations also are increasingly collaborative with their external communities. The academic library not only serves students and faculty but also community patrons who live and work close to the university within the same city and region.  

This informative webinar will provide community engagement examples of collaborative programming, relationships with local public libraries, K-12 institutions, and community colleges, and do’s and don’ts of a community outreach program. In an increasingly interconnected and global society, such collaborative relationships are an important tool for any successful academic librarian.

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Original broadcast May 14, 2019 

Biography ~ June Power
June Power is the Access Services/Reference Librarian for The University of North Carolina at Pembroke, managing circulation, course reserves, document delivery services, and copyright management. She is the managing department head and has also assisted with archival and special collections work, and genealogy. She has taught American Library Association e-courses on genealogical research and is working on her certification through the Board of Genealogical Certification. She has presented at NCLA, the ILLiad Conference, the Ares Virtual Conference, the Azaela Coast Library Association Conference, and the Access Services Conference. She is on the editorial board for the Journal of Access Services and has published a series of articles in that journal as well as several book chapters.

Beginning Genealogy: Free Resources

Beginning Genealogy: Free Resources

Where do we come from? Researching our family history is becoming more popular with subscription services such as Ancestry.com and 23andMe ancestry kits. But what if we don’t want to spend a fortune answering this question? How can we find our ancestors without costly subscriptions? How can I confirm that my ancestors were from (insert country) or that the stories my great aunt tells are true?
Knowing about free genealogy resources, both digital and physical, is one way to get started researching your genealogy. We all have a history and lack of funds should not be a barrier.
Familiarize yourself with free websites and databases as well as local resources so that you can research your own history, help a patron research, or conduct a class on genealogy.

At the conclusion of webinar, participants will be able to:
● Generate a list of geographic specific resources
● Locate hidden resources buried in databases
● Interpret Census records
● Evaluate digital resources
● Record your research

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Original broadcast April 30, 2019 


Biography ~ Maggie Rose

Maggie Rose is a librarian at the Twinsburg Public Library in Ohio. She coordinates the library book displays and is responsible for the audio book and board games collections. Maggie also teaches computer classes and sits on the Reference and Information Services Division and Adult Services Division Action Councils for the Ohio Library Council.
Maggie started library work in 5th grade as a shelver and volunteer in her school library. As a teen, she started shelving in her local public library and has held many library positions since. Maggie graduated summa cum laude from the University of Akron with a BA in English and minor in classical studies. She received her MLIS from Kent State and has been working as a librarian for six years.
Maggie loves gardening, camping and her boisterous family, which consists of a spouse, a boy, a girl, a dog, 5 cats, and 9 chickens.

Digging Up Your Roots: An Introduction to Genealogical Resear

Digging Up Your Roots: An Introduction to Genealogical Resear

Are you curious about your personal or family ancestry? Have you done a DNA test and want to know more about your roots? Do you work in a field where you get genealogical questions and want to be able to better assist your customers? Do you just enjoy historical research?

Even before the popularity of DNA testing, family history is something many people want to learn more about. However, many individuals find it is difficult to know exactly where to begin to trace their roots. While there is a plethora of information available at one’s fingertips, getting started and then sifting through the information overload to find those nuggets of information is often frustrating. Fortunately, there are many available resources that can help you to avoid that frustration and begin digging up your ancestral roots.

At the conclusion of the webinar, participants will be able to:
Know how to get organized for genealogical research
Gain familiarity with basic genealogical research tools
Gain familiarity with basic sources of genealogical information
Gain familiarity with sources of genealogical information for historically disenfranchised populations
Understand how DNA results and genealogical research intersect

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Original broadcast December 13, 2018

June Power ~ Biography
June Power is the Access Services/Reference Librarian for The University of North Carolina at Pembroke, managing circulation, course reserves, document delivery services, and copyright management. She is the managing department head and has also assisted with archival and special collections work, and genealogy. She has taught American Library Association e-courses on genealogical research and is working on her certification through the Board of Genealogical Certification. She has presented at NCLA, the ILLiad Conference, the Ares Virtual Conference, the Azaela Coast Library Association Conference, and the Access Services Conference. She is on the editorial board for the Journal of Access Services and has published a series of articles in that journal as well as several book chapters.

June works at the only university established as a state-sponsored school for Native Americans in the United States. She lives in Robeson County, NC, which is still the home of the Lumbee Tribe, with her husband, daughter, and a tribe of cats.

 

City Directories – Uncovering Clues About Your Community

City Directories – Uncovering Clues About Your Community

 

Genealogists are a special breed‐‐and their appetite for information sometimes feels endless. No reference is too obscure, no tombstone too faded. Join us to learn about an often‐overlooked resource to use when gathering information for family or local histories‐‐city directories. These directories help patrons locate information about people, organizations, and neighborhoods between the census decades and after 1940.

Explore the wealth of information in city directories
Access city directories online and in print
Utilize directories to understand growth of cities and communities
Supplement census information with city directory entries
Compile House Histories

Today, many of these resources are online. Even so, we’ll look at examples of paper and digital city directories to uncover clues about the past and present including how neighborhoods changed, who else lived in a house, when streets changed their names, and even tricks to determine when a spouse died.

 

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Original broadcast October 18, 2018

Miriam Kahn ~ Biography
MBK CONSULTING was founded by Miriam Kahn, MLS, MA, PhD in 1991. Her company specializes in providing consulting and educational services to libraries, archives, historical societies, museums and other cultural institutions. http://www.mbkcons.com

In 1992, Miriam began teaching workshops in Library & Information Science at Kent State University. These workshops continue to be popular today and include Genealogy & Local History Research Methods, Accessing Government Documents: Print & On-Line.

 

Beyond Booktalking: Whole Library Promotion

Beyond Booktalking: Whole Library Promotion

Every library employee has heard someone say they didn’t know the library offered something, whether it’s technology, programs, notary services, or any of the dozens of things we provide on a daily basis. Libraries can better spread the word when they realize that promotion and advocacy aren’t secluded to the marketing staff, but is part of everyone’s job.

Learn how to engage your staff at all levels and prepare them with the tools to “booktalk” your library and services to boost access, circulation, & attendance.

At the end of this program, attendees will be able to:
• Basic booktalking skills to get staff at all service points providing reader’s advisory
• Creatively think about underserved groups to market programs and services to a wider audience
• Keep your staff up to date on what is happening outside of their own department
• How to comfortably work promotion and library advocacy into conversation with patrons

[pdf-embedder url=”https://floridalibrarywebinars.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/6.19.18-Beyond-Booktalking.pdf” title=”6.19.18 Beyond Booktalking”]

Original broadcast June 19, 2017

Jez Layman — Biography
Jez Layman is an Adult Services Librarian at Indian Prairie Public Library in Darien, IL. When she’s not on the reference desk, she’s planning programs for 20-30 somethings for IPPL’s popular #LibSocial group or teaching classes on job hunting. She has a deep love for audiobooks and has a spreadsheet for every occasion.

 

As a Matter of Fact: Using Diplomacy to Defeat Fake News

As a Matter of Fact: Using Diplomacy to Defeat Fake News

 

Fake news often feels like a weapon in a never ending war. In that analogy, libraries are the first line of defense. But, maybe we need less focus on fighting and more on diplomacy. After all, the harder we battle someone over their beliefs, the more resistant they become.

So how do we get around the Backfire Effect? First, we have to look at ourselves. Are our personal beliefs affecting our communication style? We must create safe, nonjudgmental opportunities to teach our patrons how to assess information for accuracy and bias. That means we need to meet each patron at his/her own level. We need to educate our communities without alienating them or losing their trust. We must use diplomacy without sacrificing what we represent.

In this interactive and informative program, attendees will learn how to:
· Better understand their own biases and how those biases influence their interactions
· Understand and empathize with the patrons they disagree with
· Use facts (and avoid opinions) during these interactions
· Acknowledge when an interaction can no longer benefit the patron

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Original broadcast March 15, 2018


Sonnet Ireland ~ Biography

Sonnet Ireland is currently a reference librarian for the St. Tammany Parish Library, where she has created classes for the public on information literacy, as well as news literacy, financial literacy, and computer literacy. She has presented at numerous state, regional, national, and international conferences, including the Federal Depository Library Conference and the IFLA World Library and Information Congress. As a founding member of the NOLA Information Literacy Collective, Sonnet has been on the Executive Board since 2012 and has served as Chair of the Board twice (2014, 2017). She is also the current Second Vice President of the Louisiana Library Association. She is also active in the American Library Association and the Southeastern Library Association. Her research interests include government information, social media, Google, and news/media literacy.

 

Banned Books Week: NOW is the Time to Get Ready

Banned Books Week: NOW is the Time to Get Ready

 

 

Are you looking for some new ways to observe this annual library celebration? Kathy Barco will share ideas on how to promote Banned Books Week (September 23 – 29, 2018), including a variety of components to tailor a program suitable for teens and adults. Additionally, she will provide background on censorship, the Library Bill of Rights, and the Freedom to Read.

Very short book talks on books that have been banned or censored will also be included in this program, as well as a description of games based on banned book titles.

Attendees will also learn:
About some thought-provoking situations involving intellectual freedom encountered by librarians in a variety of library settings
How to use infographics and images from ALA and other sources
About several Top Ten Banned Books Lists
When to expect this year’s list

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Original broadcast February 22, 2018

 

Biography ~ Kathy Barco
A former children’s librarian, Kathy recently retired from the position of Literacy Coordinator at ABC (Albuquerque/Bernalillo County) Library. Previously, Kathy was Youth Services Coordinator at the New Mexico State Library from 2001-2006.

Kathy’s accomplishments include:
Graduate of the School of Library and Information Science at the University of Southern Mississippi in Hattiesburg, MS
Recipient of the 2006 Leadership Award from the New Mexico Library Association
Author of READiscover New Mexico – A Tri-Lingual Adventure in Literacy – Sunstone Press, Santa Fe
Co-author (with Valerie Nye) of True Stories of Censorship Battles in America’s Libraries – ALA Editions; Breakfast New Mexico Style and Breakfast Santa Fe Style – Sunstone Press, Santa Fe

Demystifying Genre: How To Help Every Type of Reader

Demystifying Genre: How To Help Every Type of Reader

 

Nothing is scarier than trying to help a fan of a genre you yourself don’t enjoy. You want to help that, for example, Romance reader find the perfect book, but you are having trouble knowing where to begin because…eek!… you don’t read Romance. You are afraid they will find out you are a fraud. How can YOU possibly help THEM?!? Never fear, in this program, Readers’ Advisory expert, Becky Spratford, will teach you the basic appeals of the major genres, give you the inside track on what a fan of that genre is most drawn to, and provide you with talking points to get your genres readers to tell you what they want. You will leave this webinar with the confidence and skill to help fans of every genre, regardless of whether or not you have ever read a book in that genre yourself. And that will leave a trail of happy patrons in your wake.

Attendees will learn how to:
Sort genres into like categories based on how they appeal to readers
Understand the major tropes and appeal factors for each genre and how they apply to specific authors and titles
Use genre specific resources to help readers quickly
Engage readers of any genre in meaningful and successful Readers Advisory conversations

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Original broadcast December 5, 2017

Becky Spratford ~ Biography
Becky Spratford is a Readers’ Advisor in Illinois specializing in serving patrons ages 13 and up. She trains library staff all over the world on how to match books with readers through the local public library. She runs the critically acclaimed RA training blog RA for All, and it’s evil twin, RA for All Horror, and is on the Steering Committee of the Adult Reading Round Table. She is under contract to provide content for EBSCO’s NoveList database and writes reviews for Booklist. Becky is also known for her work with horror readers as the author of The Reader’s Advisory Guide to Horror, Second Edition [ALA Editions, 2012] and is a proud member of the Horror Writers Association who are honoring her as a Special Guest of Honor at StokerCon 2017 for her contribution to the genre. You can connect with Becky on Twitter @RAforAll.

Strategies for Responding to Difficult Questions

Strategies for Responding to Difficult Questions

From the innocent “Where do babies come from?” to poking at complex political issues, a difficult question can bring conversations and workplace productivity to a halt. In libraries, they might include the vague request from the library user who doesn’t know or can’t articulate what they want. How about the loaded question meant to stop progress on a new strategic plan? Or the personal question that is more an accusation? Or the complicated problem that requires more than a simple yes or no response?

It’s not just about coming up with the “right” answer. Learn how to stay calm, confident, and competent, even when the person asking is confused, poorly informed, unorganized, or hostile. A few key strategies can keep both of you on track and, in a library workplace, can lead everyone back to work on good terms.

At the conclusion of webinar, participants will be able to:

  • Stay focused on content, not what you think the intent is
  • Stay respectful regardless of the question
  • Make a conversation a dialogue, not a monologue
  • Build trust and respect during difficult conversations
  • Take less time to deal with “hard” questions

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Original broadcst November 8, 2016

Biography ~ Pat Wagner 
Pat Wagner and her husband Leif Smith own Pattern Research, Inc., [sieralearn.com], a 41-year-old training, research, and consulting business. She has worked for libraries and higher education as an educator and consultant since 1978, focusing on behavioral and organizational skills that support institutional and personal success. Her specialties include conflict management, customer service, marketing, supervision, project management, and ethics.

Pat is a frequent speaker at state and national library conferences and has worked with libraries and library-related organizations in 48 states and Canada, from small rural storefronts to the largest urban and academic libraries. She has two published books related to libraries and contributed to Conflict Management for Libraries: Strategies for a Positive, Productive Workplace (https://www.alastore.ala.org/detail.aspx?ID=46) as well as numerous articles for library-related books and magazines.

Pat is known for her practical and good-humored programs. She lives in Denver with her husband and two pushy cats