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Video Captioning

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In this session, participants will learn the basics of video captioning. This webinar will be covering why it’s important to caption your videos, the problem(s) with automatic captioning, what (free) captioning tools you can use to caption your videos, how to perfectly caption a video, and answer any questions about video accessibility and captioning.

Slides

Presenter: Madeleine Crew is the Access and Instructional Support Technician in the Library and Learning Services department at Sheridan College in Ontario Canada. She handles alternate format requests, captions library videos, and educates staff on accessibility best practices. She is passionate about library accessibility and universal design for learning. Madeleine has presented about accessibility at the eLearning in Libraries Symposium in 2016 and the Ontario Library Association Super Conference in 2018. Madeleine has a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Theatre and Film Studies from McMaster University and a Library and Information Technician Diploma from Seneca College.

 

In partnership with TBLC,  webinars originally presented to their membership can now be found and accessed through Florida Library Webinars.

If you have questions about a session, contact TBLC.

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How Do We Do That Again? Documenting Your Library’s Work

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Are you in charge of creating documentation for the processes at your library? Do you feel overwhelmed by this task, or like you don’t know where to start? This class will break down documentation creation into manageable chunks using the five-step technical writing process. Participants will learn how to plan, structure, write, review, and publish their documentation. This course includes many opportunities for hands-on practice with the creation of documentation.

Slides

Original broadcast July 16, 2021 

Presenter: Emily Nimsakont
Emily Nimsakont is the Cataloging and Metadata Trainer at Amigos Library Services. She previously worked as Head of Cataloging and Resource Management at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln’s Schmid Law Library. She holds a master’s degree in library science from the University of Missouri-Columbia, a master’s degree in museum studies from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, and a bachelor’s degree in history and psychology from Knox College in Galesburg, Illinois.

 

In partnership with TBLC,  webinars originally presented to their membership can now be found and accessed through Florida Library Webinars.

If you have questions about a session, contact TBLC.

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FHSLA /TBLC Responsive Librarianship: Addressing Community Mental Health Information Needs Through Customized Reading & Programming

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Maintaining the health and wellness of a community can be challenging even in the most ideal situations, and the effects of the global pandemic on the most vulnerable members of the community will continue to stress social service organizations, even after the immediate health issues have been addressed. Barriers such as economic insecurity, inequitable digital access, unequal distribution of risk, insufficient public transportation infrastructures, and inadequate information literacy skills development can disenfranchise those most in need of services. Libraries, as trusted and established public institutions, can help empower communities through programs such as Responsive Librarianship.

Responsive librarianship is defined as the delivery of personalized library services in response to an exigence that produces a positive change in a user’s situation over time. Responsive Librarianship differs from traditional bibliotherapy in that it is a data-driven therapeutic reading scheme leveraging customary library services to address a narrowly defined need for a particular library population. Responsive Librarianship uses targeted reading and library services to meet the needs of the community based on three assumptions. First, library services are personalized to determine the appropriate information-based intervention for each patron. Second, services are designed to solve a specific exigence or exigencies ascertained through a reference interview, service delivery interactions, or community assessment. Third, practitioners assess users’ sustained level of engagement with texts and library programs by measuring the level of change throughout the library ecology.

Developed by researchers at the University of South Florida’s Responsive Librarianship Lab, Responsive Librarianship has been in place in our community since 2015, providing library services to adult, teen, and pre-teen populations coping with various mental health, wellness, and physical concerns. Responsive Librarianship programs are in practice in Hillsborough and Pasco counties, as well as in the City of Temple Terrace. Similar programs are planned for the Miami-Dade Public Library System in 2021 and a state-wide system of Responsive Librarianship is also being developed through a partnership with the Vermont Department of Labor to facilitate return to work programs. In this presentation, we’ll be discussing Responsive Librarianship and the implementation of Responsive Librarianship programming.

Slides

USF School of Information Responsive Librarianship Lab Team Members

Peter Cannon, PhD, is the Program Coordinator for the USFSI Responsive Librarianship Lab. His current research applies findings from the neurosciences, which suggest reading fiction may improve an individual’s socio-cognitive abilities, to the development of therapeutic library collections.

Natalie Greene Taylor, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor and the Program Coordinator for the School of Information’s MLIS program at the University of South Florida (USF). Her research focuses on youth information literacy, information intermediaries, and information policy.

 

In partnership with TBLC,  webinars originally presented to their membership can now be found and accessed through Florida Library Webinars.

If you have questions about a session, contact TBLC.

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After Teen Services: Library Programming and Outreach for the New Adult

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According to the Pew Research Center over 50% of people between the ages of 16 and 29 visit a bookmobile or library each year. However, libraries often omit this new adult population from dedicated programming and outreach.

During this two-hour session, we will identify services and programming initiatives created with the new adult’s needs and interests in mind, comparing such programs to separate teen and adult initiatives.   We will also design outreach plans directed to new adults in public and academic libraries.

Learning Objectives:

  • Define New Adult
  • Compare the needs of the new adult population with teens and adults
  • Identify programs for the new adult population
  • Design outreach plans to the new adult population

Slides

Presenter: Erin Gray
After earning her master’s degree in library science from the University of Missouri-Columbia, Erin went on to work in Branch Management, Collection Development and Youth Services for over a decade in public libraries. She is an advocate for all libraries and a past President of the Missouri Library Association. Erin enjoys facilitating continuing education classes of all types as a Library Services and Technology Trainer for Amigos Library Services.

 

In partnership with TBLC,  webinars originally presented to their membership can now be found and accessed through Florida Library Webinars.

If you have questions about a session, contact TBLC.

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Bookclub Reboot

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Is your book club feeling stale? Are you struggling to keep readers engaged?

In this session, the authors of “Book Club Reboot: 71 Creative Twists” (ALA Editions, 2019) will share real examples of out-of-the-box book clubs from around the country that will help you take a fresh look at your own book club offerings. From unique meeting locations, to reaching niche populations, to time-saving techniques and savvy partnerships, you will leave with ideas to put to work in your library right away.

Presenter: Sarah Ostman is the Communications Manager in the American Library Association’s Public Programs Office, where she serves as editor of ProgrammingLibrarian.org. Before joining ALA and the library field in 2014, she spent nearly a decade as a newspaper reporter, editor and freelance writer. She is also the author of “Going Virtual: Programs and Insights from a Time of Crisis” (ALA Editions, 2021).

 Presenter: Stephanie Saba is a Community Program Supervisor at San Mateo County Libraries. Over the last 15 years, she has led book clubs in three different communities, including two 20-30-something book clubs, a mother-daughter book club and a senior book club.

In partnership with TBLC,  webinars originally presented to their membership can now be found and accessed through Florida Library Webinars.

If you have questions about a session, contact TBLC.

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RDA Cataloging ~ Construction and Use of Relationships

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RDA provides methods to explicitly document types of relationships between the manifestation being described and the access points of agents responsible for the creation of or contribution to the work and/or expression embodied in the manifestation. RDA also allows for structured relationships between the work, expression, manifestation, and/or item and other works, expressions, manifestations, and items. These relationships are fundamental to the entity- relationship model put forth in the IFLA-LRM (International Federation of Library Associations & Institutions-Library Reference Model) theoretical model.

This workshop provides instructions on identifying and constructing access points for works, expressions, manifestations, and items and the application of relationship designators to various authorized access points using the MARC 21 Format for Bibliographic Data (MFBD). Can be paired with Moving Images and Video Games (or any of the other workshops) for a more comprehensive treatment.

Learning Outcomes
Participants will be able to apply the RDA instructions for the construction of general access points for works, expressions, manifestations, and items; for the application of relationship designators to the access points; and for the methods to encode these relationships in the MFBD. Participants will be introduced to the concept of aggregates.

Presenter: Bobby Bothmann is a professor at Minnesota State University, Mankato where he serves as the catalog and metadata librarian. Bobby catalogs analog and digital resources of all kinds, including books, serials, moving images, objects, cartographic resources, musical and spoken word audio recordings, and music in between many meetings. He is a member of the editorial board for Cataloging & Classification Quarterly and an active member of OLAC (OnLine Audiovisual Catalogers) where he has served in various leadership roles including treasurer and president. He holds an MLIS from the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee and an MS in Geography and English Technical Communication from MSU Mankato. Bobby moonlights as an adjunct instructor for the School of Information Science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign where he teaches cataloging and classification courses and tries to covert one student per semester to the cataloging side of the Force.

In partnership with TBLC,  webinars originally presented to their membership can now be found and accessed through Florida Library Webinars.

If you have questions about a session, contact TBLC.

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Negotiation and Cost Containment for eCollections

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Working with Vendors: Negotiation Strategies for Cost Containment

To help meet the information needs of patrons, libraries must license electronic resources at the lowest possible cost with the best possible terms. This session is intended to help librarians negotiate better contracts with vendors for licensing databases, online journals, eBooks, and streaming media.

Topics to be addressed include the following:

  • General overview of how licensing and negotiation support collection development strategy in 21st Century libraries
  • Gathering and sharing intelligence about the information marketplace
  • Maintaining effective business relationships with vendors
  • Negotiation for librarians (preparation, techniques, and useful practices)
  • Cost containment strategies and business models
  • License terms that require special attention
  • Issues for further consideration: COVID-19 and more

Presenter Bio:

George Stachokas is the Collections Strategist and Acquisitions Librarian at Auburn University Libraries. Originally from Indiana, his professional roles at academic libraries in Indiana and Alabama have included nearly ten years of experience in negotiating complex license agreements for electronic resources. George is the author of two books, The Role of the Electronic Resources Librarian (Chandos, 2019) and After the Book: Information Services for the 21st Century (Chandos, 2014), as well as editor of Reengineering the Library: Issues in Electronic Resources Management (American Library Association, 2018). He holds an MLIS degree from the University of Illinois, an MA in History from Indiana State University, and a BS in Economics from Purdue University.

In partnership with TBLC,  webinars originally presented to their membership can now be found and accessed through Florida Library Webinars.

If you have questions about a session, contact TBLC.

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Excel for Technical Services

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This webinar will demonstrate features of Excel that can make data easier to both read and analyze. Presenter, Karen Kohn, will walk through each step using a report generated from the ILS. The first half of the session will focus on viewing lists of items and ways to manipulate a list for better readability. Participants will learn tips that can make Excel spreadsheets easier to read for those who don’t necessarily work in Excel regularly. The second half of the session will explore ways to transform data for analysis, including: importing fields from one spreadsheet into another, finding duplicates, splitting columns that have multiple values, and using conditional formatting to help visualize data.
 
At the end of this webinar, attendees will be able to:
  • Create filters in Excel and use them to count and sum subsets of a spreadsheet
  • Filter a column in a spreadsheet by text, number, or color
  • Create a pivot table
  • Use formulas to do basic arithmetic in Excel
  • Import data from one spreadsheet into another
  • Use conditional formatting to find duplicates or outlier values, and to create simple data visualizations
  • Split cells that contain multiple values, e.g., multiple ISBNs
Audience:
This session is intended for paraprofessionals and librarians. It is meant for people who don’t necessarily work in Excel regularly, however people in the library who use Excel for analysis will also benefit.
 

Presenter: Karen Kohn is Collections Analysis Librarian at Temple University in Philadelphia, PA and the author of Collection Evaluation in Academic Libraries: A Practical Guide for Librarians (Rowman & Littlefield, 2015). She has published articles in College & Research Libraries, Journal of Academic Librarianship, Journal of Documentation, and Collection Management and presented at the Charleston Library Conference and the Acquisitions Institute at Timberline Lodge. She is the instructor of the online course Introduction to Collection Analysis, offered through Library Juice Academy. She has an MLS from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and an MA in Sociology from Temple University.

In partnership with TBLC,  webinars originally presented to their membership can now be found and accessed through Florida Library Webinars.

If you have questions about a session, contact TBLC.

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FHSLA /TBLC Mental Health Awareness

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No one is immune from the toxic stress caused by the COVID-19 public health crisis. Learn about resources to build resilience to the stressors of daily life, especially during the past year of quarantine and physical distancing, and to better manage your mental health.
 
 
 
Presenter: Ardis Hanson, PhD, MLS, AHIP
Ardis is Assistant Director for Research and Education at the USF Health Libraries and has over 25 years of experience in behavioral health research services and policy. As the former director of the Louis de la Parte Florida Mental Health Institute (FMHI) Research Library, she worked extensively with consumers, family members, and advocates to improve mental health services and patient outcomes.
 
Presenter: Olivia Dileonardo
Olivia DiLeonardo is a Medical Librarian and Narrative Medicine Instructor at Nemours Children’s Hospital and University of Central Florida College of Medicine, where she has led Narrative Medicine instruction for medical students, residents, and faculty since 2014. Olivia holds a Certificate of Professional Achievement in Narrative Medicine from Columbia University.

In partnership with TBLC,  webinars originally presented to their membership can now be found and accessed through Florida Library Webinars.

If you have questions about a session, contact TBLC.

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Teaching Better Online Privacy

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Jessamyn West has been helping people with their computers in rural Vermont for 15 years and she’s created a simple privacy toolkit to help people understand the complicated world of online privacy. She’ll share her talk and the resources she uses to support the talk so that more librarians can help their patrons stay safer and more confident online.

Bio: Jessamyn West is a library technologist from Randolph Vermont. She is a nationally known speaker, writer, and educator on the issues facing today’s libraries. Her blog focusing on libraries and politics, Librarian.net, is one of the earliest and longest running librarian websites. She writes a column for Computers in Libraries magazine and is the author of the book Without a Net: Librarians Bridging the Digital Divide. As a librarian without a library, for the past fifteen years she has spent most of her time working with her local community as a hands-on technology educator.

In partnership with TBLC,  webinars originally presented to their membership can now be found and accessed through Florida Library Webinars.

If you have questions about a session, contact TBLC.