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RDA Cataloging ~ Construction and Use of Relationships

RDA Cataloging ~ Construction and Use of Relationships

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RDA provides methods to explicitly document types of relationships between the manifestation being described and the access points of agents responsible for the creation of or contribution to the work and/or expression embodied in the manifestation. RDA also allows for structured relationships between the work, expression, manifestation, and/or item and other works, expressions, manifestations, and items. These relationships are fundamental to the entity- relationship model put forth in the IFLA-LRM (International Federation of Library Associations & Institutions-Library Reference Model) theoretical model.

This workshop provides instructions on identifying and constructing access points for works, expressions, manifestations, and items and the application of relationship designators to various authorized access points using the MARC 21 Format for Bibliographic Data (MFBD). Can be paired with Moving Images and Video Games (or any of the other workshops) for a more comprehensive treatment.

Learning Outcomes
Participants will be able to apply the RDA instructions for the construction of general access points for works, expressions, manifestations, and items; for the application of relationship designators to the access points; and for the methods to encode these relationships in the MFBD. Participants will be introduced to the concept of aggregates.

Presenter: Bobby Bothmann is a professor at Minnesota State University, Mankato where he serves as the catalog and metadata librarian. Bobby catalogs analog and digital resources of all kinds, including books, serials, moving images, objects, cartographic resources, musical and spoken word audio recordings, and music in between many meetings. He is a member of the editorial board for Cataloging & Classification Quarterly and an active member of OLAC (OnLine Audiovisual Catalogers) where he has served in various leadership roles including treasurer and president. He holds an MLIS from the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee and an MS in Geography and English Technical Communication from MSU Mankato. Bobby moonlights as an adjunct instructor for the School of Information Science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign where he teaches cataloging and classification courses and tries to covert one student per semester to the cataloging side of the Force.

In partnership with TBLC,  webinars originally presented to their membership can now be found and accessed through Florida Library Webinars.

If you have questions about a session, contact TBLC.

RDA Cataloging ~ Construction and Use of Relationships

Negotiation and Cost Containment for eCollections

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Working with Vendors: Negotiation Strategies for Cost Containment

To help meet the information needs of patrons, libraries must license electronic resources at the lowest possible cost with the best possible terms. This session is intended to help librarians negotiate better contracts with vendors for licensing databases, online journals, eBooks, and streaming media.

Topics to be addressed include the following:

  • General overview of how licensing and negotiation support collection development strategy in 21st Century libraries
  • Gathering and sharing intelligence about the information marketplace
  • Maintaining effective business relationships with vendors
  • Negotiation for librarians (preparation, techniques, and useful practices)
  • Cost containment strategies and business models
  • License terms that require special attention
  • Issues for further consideration: COVID-19 and more

Presenter Bio:

George Stachokas is the Collections Strategist and Acquisitions Librarian at Auburn University Libraries. Originally from Indiana, his professional roles at academic libraries in Indiana and Alabama have included nearly ten years of experience in negotiating complex license agreements for electronic resources. George is the author of two books, The Role of the Electronic Resources Librarian (Chandos, 2019) and After the Book: Information Services for the 21st Century (Chandos, 2014), as well as editor of Reengineering the Library: Issues in Electronic Resources Management (American Library Association, 2018). He holds an MLIS degree from the University of Illinois, an MA in History from Indiana State University, and a BS in Economics from Purdue University.

In partnership with TBLC,  webinars originally presented to their membership can now be found and accessed through Florida Library Webinars.

If you have questions about a session, contact TBLC.

Making a Collection Count

Making a Collection Count

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Make your collection count! This program talks about the overall quality of a library collection.

We will deep dive into collection philosophies, objectives, benchmarks, and all sorts of metrics to keep library collections in tip-top shape.

Our holistic approach to collection management will help all types and sizes of libraries keep pace with the demands and expectations of their communities.

Holly Hibner is the Adult Services Coordinator at the Plymouth District Library in Plymouth, Michigan. She has a mild obsession with weeding (ok, maybe not so mild), and can often be found walking the stacks looking for missing, damaged, and just plain weird titles. She also loves all things techie and the challenge of a good reference question. Holly is riding high and pulling all the glory out of her second term as a Councilor-at-Large for the American Library Association.

Mary Kelly is the Digital Resources and Emerging Technologies Librarian at the Plymouth District Library in Plymouth, Michigan. She is passionate about collection quality and, when she’s not wrangling with Overdrive, she is usually hunched over the computer looking at spreadsheets. She spent a few years in Youth Services, molding young minds through Toddler Disco, but recently returned to the promised land of Adult Services. For street cred, Holly and Mary co-authored the book “Making a Collection Count: A Holistic Approach to Library Collection Management.” Reading it will surely change your life, so interlibrary loan a copy today! They are also co-authors of the popular blog “Awful Library Books.”

Class Resources

Slides

Chat Log

In partnership with PLAN,  webinars originally presented to their membership can now be found and accessed through Florida Library Webinars.

If you have questions about a session, contact PLAN.

Making Your Website More Accessible Without Rebuilding It from the Ground Up

Making Your Website More Accessible Without Rebuilding It from the Ground Up

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Website accessibility continues to gain importance as organizations realize that there are serious legal consequences for websites that aren’t usable by people with disabilities.

However, it is not always immediately practical to rebuild a website in its entirety to meet accessibility criteria.

In this 1-hour webinar, we’ll briefly discuss the legal landscape, and then break down some concrete actions and changes you can make specifically to your website’s content to make it more accessible by people with visual disabilities.

Laura Solomon, MLS, is the Library Services Manager for the Ohio Public Library Information Network and a W3C-certified front-end web developer. She has been doing web development and design for more than twenty years, in both public libraries and as an independent consultant. She specializes in developing with Drupal. She is a 2010 Library Journal Mover & Shaker. She’s written three books about social media and content marketing, specifically for libraries, and speaks nationally on both these and technology-related topics. As a former children’s librarian, she enjoys bringing the “fun of technology” to audiences and in giving libraries the tools they need to better serve the virtual customer.

Class Resources

Handout

Chat Log

In partnership with PLAN,  webinars originally presented to their membership can now be found and accessed through Florida Library Webinars.

If you have questions about a session, contact PLAN.

Beyond Ancestry.com: Online Genealogy Resources for Beginners

Beyond Ancestry.com: Online Genealogy Resources for Beginners

 

Are you planning to track down information online about your family history? Do you have users coming in asking for a good starting place? The good news is that thousands of digitized records from hundreds of sources have become available online to aid researchers in building their family tree. And new sources and records are being added every day to accessible databases. The challenging news is that there are thousands of digitized records online. The bad news? The information, gathered from court records, newspapers, passenger lists, census records, and historical society collections, can be fraught with errors and eccentricities.

Why do your grandmother records have seven different spellings of her first name?
Why can’t you find your aunt Peggy’s birth certificate?
Why can’t you find the record of your mom’s entry into the United States?
And what do you do when you find four men named Nathaniel Payne within three generations of brothers and fathers? And previous amateur researchers have reproduced mistakes in their own records and shared the errors until they became the new canon, so that dates and places are applied to the wrong Nats?

Based on 45 years’ experience, here are expert tips for getting started researching your family’s history, including tricks for verifying contradictory information (aka “family confabulations”), record-keeping, creating your own digital records, free versus fee-based sites, the debate about online DNA, finding lost but living “twigs and branches”, and building a family team.

Outcomes
– Record those family stories today. Don’t wait.
– Build your own databases of family information.
– Share family stories, documents, and photos digitally for future generations.
– Accept that family stories have power, but that does not mean they are accurate.

 
 
Original broadcast November 25, 2020 


Presenter ~ Pat Wagner

Pat Wagner has been a trainer and consultant for libraries since 1978 using e-mail, platforms, and now social media to serve clients across the United States (and the solar system) who she has never met face-to-face.. She presents at state and national library conferences as well as working with libraries of all types from Alaska to Florida. She has been a frequent visitor to Florida libraries and was a facilitator for the Sunshine State Library Leadership Institute for several years. Pat focuses on skills needed to support better productivity and workplace relationships, from personnel issues to strategic planning. She is known for her practical and good-humored programs.

RDA Cataloging ~ Construction and Use of Relationships

Cataloging Graphic Novels and Comics

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This one hour session will cover the basic definitions related to graphic novels and comics using a variety of fiction and nonfiction examples for demonstration. The session will pay special attention to descriptive cataloging areas, their associated RDA instructions, and the MARC 21 tags to use. It will also address considerations for subject analysis, genre vocabulary, and classification choices. At the end of the session, participants will a) have definitions for the variety of resources generally attributed as “graphic novels,” b) know the best practices for descriptive cataloging of graphic novels, and c) understand the various choices for classification and subject analysis.

Audience: Cataloging staff and other staff who work with graphic novels and comics.

Presenter: Bobby Bothmann is a professor at Minnesota State University, Mankato where he serves as the catalog and metadata librarian. Bobby catalogs analog and digital resources of all kinds, including books, serials, moving images, objects, cartographic resources, musical and spoken word audio recordings, and music in between many meetings. He is a member of the editorial board for Cataloging & Classification Quarterly and an active member of OLAC (OnLine Audiovisual Catalogers) where he has served in various leadership roles including treasurer and president. He holds an MLIS from the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee and an MS in Geography and English Technical Communication from MSU Mankato. Bobby moonlights as an adjunct instructor for the School of Information Science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign where he teaches cataloging and classification courses and tries to covert one student per semester to the cataloging side of the Force.

In partnership with TBLC,  webinars originally presented to their membership can now be found and accessed through Florida Library Webinars.

If you have questions about a session, contact TBLC.

An Introduction to Universal Design for Learning

An Introduction to Universal Design for Learning

 

According to CAST, “Universal Design for Learning (UDL) is a framework to improve and optimize teaching and learning for all people based on scientific insights into how humans learn.” In this interactive and informative session, Lauren will introduce the attendees to the UDL framework and provide examples of how using the framework impacts learning.

Concrete ideas and strategies will be discussed for those that teach or train in Academic and Public libraries. Attendees will walk away with practical ideas for how to implement UDL in their own teaching.

As a result of this program, attendees will:

• Recognize the main components of Universal Design for Learning
• Consider ways to apply Universal Design for Learning in their own teaching
• Reflect on what they want to change to incorporate Universal Design for Learning

Handout

Original broadcast March 31, 2020

Biography ~ Lauren Hays
Lauren Hays, PhD, is the instructional and research librarian at MidAmerica Nazarene University in Olathe, KS where she enjoys teaching and being a member of her institution’s Faculty Development Committee. She has co-presented at the annual conference for the International Society for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning and was the 2017 speaker on SoTL for the Association of College and Research Libraries’ Student Learning and Information Literacy Committee’s Midwinter Discussion. Her professional interests include SoTL, teaching, information literacy, educational technology, library and information science education, teacher identity, and academic development. On a personal note, she loves dogs, traveling, and home.

Library Social Media During the Pandemic – Part 1 of 2

Library Social Media During the Pandemic – Part 1 of 2

NEFLIN
This webinar will focus on how to approach marketing public libraries online, across social media, in the current climate. Do we become more serious, more fun, post less often, more often? How do we frame messages so they have the most impact? What actually matters to our audiences right now?
In particular we’ll look at Twitter, Facebook and Instagram. We’ll discuss when and what to tweet, multimedia and images, and accessibility. We’ll talk about tone during these very tricky times, and share examples of successful tweets, as well as focusing on what works to build engagement for library twitter accounts.
We’ll also look at boosting engagement across Facebook, the largest social network in the world: how do we use it strategically and to get key messages to our users during the pandemic? Instagram is by far the most important newer platform for Libraries, and you don’t need a good camera to make it work. We’ll look at types of content, logistics, and tagging – plus a hack for posting to Instagram from laptops and PCs.

Ned Potter
Ned Potter is an Academic Liaison Librarian at the University of York, and a Trainer on library marketing for organizations in the UK, the US, South Africa, Australia and New Zealand. He authored the Library Marketing Toolkit, published by Facet Publishing / Neal Schuman in 2012; it has been Number One in the Amazon Library charts on both sides of the Atlantic.

Ned has been named a Library Journal Mover & Shaker(link is external) and was a winner of a Special Libraries Association Early Career Conference Award(link is external). He can be found online at ned-potter.com(link is external) and on Twitter at @ned_potter(link is external).

Class Resources

video password: neflin

In partnership with NEFLIN,  webinars originally presented to their membership can now be found and accessed through Florida Library Webinars.

If you have questions about a session, contact NEFLIN.

Does the Word Copyright Make You Want to Cringe? Help is Here!

You are not alone in your feelings about copyright; the word makes many people uncomfortable. The academic world tends to cringe when you mention the word copyright. Many think and hope they fall under the Fair Use Act, or the TEACH Act and that educational use keeps them lawful. Faculty may have a “don’t ask, don’t tell” mentality when dealing with numerous copyright issues. Copyright does not have to be that complicated.

Come discover some of the simple things you can do to ensure your electronic course content (images, documents, etc.) keeps you in the clear with Copyright Laws.

Original broadcast August 8, 2017

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Cheryl Ann Coyle ~ Biography
Cheryl Ann is sharing her passion for copyright with the world. She graduated from C.W. Post, Long Island University in 1995 with her Master’s in Library Science. She has presented several workshops at local and state conferences on the various aspects of Copyright, and continually shares her knowledge through her website, www.copyrightlibrarian.com.

Seeking more knowledge of copyright, she recently completed her Certificate in Copyright Management through SLA and CopyrightLaws.com. She also serves as a member of her Library Copyright Committee and is working on ways to facilitate more copyright discussions among professional staff and faculty in colleges.

Intellectual Freedom and the Collection Management Policy

Intellectual Freedom and the Collection Management Policy

One of the core values in libraries is Intellectual Freedom, ensuring free access to information. Collection Management is one of the key areas in that mission. Creating policies that ensure diversity and accessibility to information for our communities, while also valuing the different opinions in that community, can be challenging for the library organization. 

It is important to understand the core concepts of Intellectual Freedom and how they apply to collection development so that your library is fulfilling its mission in your community.

After this webinar participants will:

  • Understand what ‘intellectual freedom’ means and ensure that collection management policies include and align with these concepts
  • Understand the processes for handling challenges to materials and services and be able to create appropriate procedures and documents for challenges
  • Be more aware of tools to assist with intellectual freedom concepts and collection management

Originally broadcast September 23, 2014. 

Melissa Powell ~ Biography
Melissa Powell has worked for 35 years in libraries as a paraprofessional and degreed professional, in addition to a 4-year “retirement” to learn about the book & publishing industry. She is an Independent Librarian currently teaching Cataloging Fundamentals and Collection Management both online and through state libraries, library consortia, and other education agencies.  She spent 2009 organizing a local history collection at a public library in the mountains of Colorado (“from boxes to shelves”), 2012-13 assisting with the setup and cataloging of a dual language university catalog, and regularly consults with school and public libraries on technical and public services.