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What Libraries Collect

What Libraries Collect

 

Privacy Literacy and Data Ethics: They didn’t stop to think if they should Explore data ethics, digital privacy, and the academic librarian’s role in educating and advocating for undergraduate students relating to these topics in this five-part workshop series.  

The goal of this series is to educate librarians on data ethics and privacy literacy, encourage discussion, and facilitate future collaborations. Sessions are related, but attendance in every session is not required.

Libraries collect vast amounts of data, both as a side-effect of our daily services and when we conduct research or assessments. At the same time that we educate library patrons on privacy and data ethics in their daily lives, it is incumbent upon library workers to collect, store, and use data ethically, and with particular attention to patrons’ privacy.

In this interactive webinar, we will explore the types of data our institutions collect, examine how we protect these data, and interrogate how we use data ethically to improve services without causing harm to our patrons.

Learning Outcomes
● Participants will become aware of the various types of data collected within their library.
● Participants will interrogate how those data are being used.
● Participants will consider how those data are stored.

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Original broadcast October 20, 2021 

Presenter: Adam Beauchamp is a Humanities Librarian at Florida State University Libraries serving as liaison to the departments of History, Philosophy, and Religion. His responsibilities include research support, information literacy instruction, and collection development in these disciplines. Adam’s current research interests include critical pedagogy, ethical assessment and research in libraries, and the historical relationship of archives and libraries to colonialism.

Presenter: Sara Gonzalez is the Physical Sciences, Mathematics, and Visualization Librarian and Associate Chair at the Marston Science Library at the University of Florida. Her research interests include emerging technologies in education and libraries, modeling and visualization of 3D data, and scientific literacy instruction.

Teaching Tips for Virtual Library Sessions

Teaching Tips for Virtual Library Sessions

 

While there are many similarities between teaching face-to-face and online, there are also many differences. Teaching virtually requires the use of different engagement strategies and different pedagogical methods. In this session, you will learn specific strategies for engaging students in a virtual environment. You will also learn specific pedagogical strategies for sharing content and helping students learn.

At the end of the session, you will be asked to briefly share about a lesson you teach virtually and what virtual teaching tip you will implement.

As a result of this program:
• Attendees will be able to identify virtual teaching strategies
• Attendees will be able to select virtual teaching strategies for content they teach
• Attendees will be able to implement virtual teaching strategies

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Original broadcast October 14, 2021 

 

Presenter: Lauren Hays, PhD, is the instructional and research librarian at MidAmerica Nazarene University in Olathe, KS where she enjoys teaching and being a member of her institution’s Faculty Development Committee. She has co-presented at the annual conference for the International Society for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning and was the 2017 speaker on SoTL for the Association of College and Research Libraries’ Student Learning and Information Literacy Committee’s Midwinter Discussion.
Her professional interests include SoTL, teaching, information literacy, educational technology, library and information science education, teacher identity, and academic development. On a personal note, she loves dogs, traveling, and home.

Online Education, Privacy, & Students Rights

Online Education, Privacy, & Students Rights

Privacy Literacy and Data Ethics: They didn’t stop to think if they should Explore data ethics, digital privacy, and the academic librarian’s role in educating and advocating for undergraduate students relating to these topics in this five-part workshop series.  The goal of this series is to educate librarians on data ethics and privacy literacy, encourage discussion, and facilitate future collaborations. Sessions are related, but attendance in every session is not required. During this session, we will explore student privacy related to online instruction and digital learning. With the swift transition to fully remote online teaching and learning with COVID-19, many of the existing problems with student agency and data were magnified, as exemplified by the backlash against online proctoring. We will look at the privacy cost of online learning through the requirement of third-party technologies such as the learning management system and video conferencing software, explore student perspectives on privacy issues, and provide recommendations for library professionals to advocate for student privacy in distance learning environments

Learning Outcomes:
● Identify student privacy issues and perspectives in online education
● Discuss online education through a privacy-minded lens
Provide strategies and tools for supporting & advocating for students

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Original broadcast October 13, 2021 
 

Presenter: Lindsey Wharton serves as the Extended Campus & Distance Services Librarian at Florida State University and is responsible for ensuring equitable access to library resources and services for online and off-campus users. Additionally, she serves as the liaison to the College of Social Work, coordinates distance library services and library integrations in the learning management system, and contributes to campus-wide OER and affordability initiatives. Her research interests include distance learning & libraries, open & affordable education resources, and privacy & critical information literacy.

Presenter: Stephanie A. Jacobs is a Blended Instructional Design Librarian at the University of South Florida, where she partners with fellow librarians, faculty members, and others to bring a visual approach to information literacy instruction through the creation of instructional videos, online learning objects, and web-based library instruction. Her research interests include emerging technology for information literacy instruction, privacy issues, student engagement & interaction, educational design, and communication dynamics.

Data and Privacy Ethics

Data and Privacy Ethics

 

They didn’t stop to think if they should Explore data ethics, digital privacy, and the academic librarian’s role in educating and advocating for undergraduate students relating to these topics in this five-part workshop series.  The goal of this series is to educate librarians on data ethics and privacy literacy, encourage discussion, and facilitate future collaborations. Sessions are related, but attendance in every session is not required. We will begin with a broad overview of data ethics and particularly what these mean during our increasing reliance on digital tools, often from third-party companies.

This will include looking at how companies, institutions, and individuals choose to collect and use personal data, as well as ways to educate students in collecting and using data ethically. We will also look at power dynamics and the inherently biased system of data collection and use.

Learning Outcomes:
● Participants will examine how data ethics relates to privacy and librarianship
● Participants will define their own ethics in regards to data with an understanding of how it relates to their work
● Participants will identify potential ethical concerns relating to data and privacy for both librarians and patrons.

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Original broadcast October 6, 2021 

 

Presenter: Emily Zoe Mann is the student success librarian at the University of South Florida, St. Petersburg campus. She serves as the liaison to Social Sciences, English, Graphic Arts, and Anthropology. Her research areas focus on data literacy and diversity, equity, and inclusion. She has presented nationally and internationally on data literacy. In her spare time, she enjoys dogs and the beach.

Presenter: Alexandrea Glenn is currently the Student Success Librarian at the University of Florida. Alexandrea graduated from Wayne State University with an MLIS and a certificate in Information Management. Her research interests include information literacy, privacy/data literacy, and student engagement/outreach. In her spare time, she enjoys baking, hanging with her cats (not at the same time), and traveling.

Making Your Images Ready For The Web

Making Your Images Ready For The Web

TBLC logo

Are you responsible for creating and/or posting graphics or photos online? Are your photos
stretched or pixelated? Are graphics optimized specifically for specific social media channels?

Are website images inadvertently sucking up your patron’s (expensive) mobile bandwidth?
Does your library follow recommended best practices,  to get the most attention for your images?

Presenter: Laura Solomon
Laura Solomon is the Library Services Manager for the Ohio Public Library Information Network  and a W3C-certified front-end web developer.  She has been doing web development and design for more than twenty years, in both public libraries and as an independent consultant. She specializes in developing with Drupal. She is a 2010 Library Journal Mover & Shaker. She’s written three books about social media and content marketing, specifically for libraries, and speaks nationally on both these and technology-related topics.  As a former children’s librarian, she enjoys bringing the “fun of technology” to audiences and in giving libraries the tools they need to better serve the virtual customer.

 

In partnership with TBLC,  webinars originally presented to their membership can now be found and accessed through Florida Library Webinars.

If you have questions about a session, contact TBLC.

Introducing Blockchain and Cryptocurrencies and How They Can Impact Libraries

Introducing Blockchain and Cryptocurrencies and How They Can Impact Libraries

 
 

 

The first generation of the digital revolution brought us the Internet and sprouted a world of information. The second generation is bringing us the “Internet of value” powered by blockchain, which is a new, distributed platform that can ensure the integrity of data exchange between billions of devices without going through a trusted third party.

In this webinar:

– Learn what blockchain is and appreciate its overall importance,
– Understand how cryptocurrencies record transactions using blockchain technology,
– Highlight innovative blockchain applications that are transforming society, and
– Discuss how libraries can use blockchain and cryptocurrencies to enhance their value.

Handout

Original broadcast September 29, 2021

Presenter: Chad Mairn
Chad Mairn is an Information Services Librarian, Assistant Professor, and manages the Innovation Lab at St. Petersburg College.

While an undergraduate studying Humanities at the University of South Florida (USF), Chad was awarded a Library of Congress Fellowship archiving Leonard Bernstein’s personal papers. During his Library and Information Science (LIS) graduate work, also at USF, Chad became a technology liaison between the Bill Gates Learning Foundation and Florida public libraries.

Chad also plays drums in two bands: Low Season and It Will Flood.

How to Plan a GivingTuesday Campaign

How to Plan a GivingTuesday Campaign

 

GivingTuesday 2020 reports are in – total giving increased from $1.97 billion to $2.47 billion in the United States alone, representing a 25% increase compared to GivingTuesday 2019. Read more here.

This year Giving Tuesday is November 30 and it’s never too early to start planning for a successful campaign! The hard truth is that simply sending out one email and telling your donors that you are participating in this international day of giving is not enough.

Julia Campbell, digital marketing strategist for social good organizations, has helped dozens of small and mid-size nonprofits launch successful Giving Tuesday campaigns, and she will teach you exactly what to do to reach your goals this Giving Tuesday for your library.

Join this session to learn:
– How to create your own Giving Tuesday Campaign Calendar
– How to recruit your Giving Tuesday Committee
– How to motivate your supporters to participate in your Giving Tuesday campaign
– How to create a simple online Social Media Toolkit to promote the campaign
– How to incorporate storytelling throughout your Giving Tuesday materials
– How to promote your Giving Tuesday campaign on your website, in email, and on social media channels, with nonprofit examples,
including how to use Facebook Live
– Review of a comprehensive Giving Tuesday Day-Of Checklist so nothing falls through the cracks

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Slides

Original broadcast September 22, 2021 

Presenter: Julia Campbell
Julia Campbell has a long history of helping nonprofits find success using digital storytelling strategies. After 10 years in the nonprofit sector as a small shop development and marketing director, she founded J Campbell Social Marketing, a boutique digital marketing agency based north of Boston. Julia received her Bachelor’s in Journalism & Communications from Boston University and earned a Master in Public Administration from Old Dominion University as well as a Certificate in Nonprofit Management from Tidewater Community College. A Boston native, a Returned Peace Corps Volunteer, a mother of two, and a lover of activism and social causes, Julia helps nonprofits build movements and connect with supporters by effectively harnessing the power and potential of online marketing and social media tools. Julia’s clients include small community-based nonprofits and large universities. She also offers small group coaching sessions, workshops & seminars and online trainings. The author of Storytelling in the Digital Age: A Guide for Nonprofits, Julia’s blog about online fundraising and nonprofit technology is #3 on the Top 40 Nonprofit Marketing Blogs and Websites for Nonprofit Marketers and Fundraisers and is consistently featured in the list of Top 150 Nonprofit Blogs in the world.

Vetting Online Resources for Health and Well-Being – Who Can You Trust Regarding Medical Advice?

Vetting Online Resources for Health and Well-Being – Who Can You Trust Regarding Medical Advice?

 

 

One of the more frustrating lessons most of us have learned during the pandemic is how much experienced degreed scientists and medical professionals can disagree. And how the body of knowledge about disease can shift and change rapidly. If you decided to research more information yourself about the virus, you found yourself plummeting down multiple, contradictory rabbit holes. Even if you are looking for something as simple as safe and effective home remedies for a sore throat or an itchy rash, the amount of information available is overwhelming.

Learning to navigate online resources related to health begins with establishing a relationship with medical professionals who you like and trust, so that your research is an extension, not a substitute, of quality health care for you and your family. It also means starting your education with the best quality sites, those run by accredited medical schools and professional societies, clinics, pharmacies, and educational associations as well as sites that evaluate prescription medicines for side effects and contraindications and provide protocols for supporting well-being while dealing with chronic and acute illnesses.

Topics include the reasons you might need a second or third opinion, why there are so many opinions, the pros and cons of following medical studies, how to find valid information about what is called integrative or complementary medicine, and as a bonus, researching information on behalf of your pets.

Outcomes:
– Take better charge of you and your family’s health and well-being.
– Educate yourself about warning signs that would require professional help.
– Create a list of sites to use to review health issues such as prescription interactions, first aid, and over-the-counter remedies.
– Bring informed questions and concerns to your visits with health care providers.

Note View

Slides

Original broadcast September 15, 2021 

Presenter: Pat Wagner
Pat Wagner has been a trainer and consultant for libraries since 1978 using e-mail, platforms, and now social media to serve clients across the United States (and the solar system) who she has never met face-to-face.. She presents at state and national library conferences as well as working with libraries of all types from Alaska to Florida. She has been a frequent visitor to Florida libraries and was a facilitator for the Sunshine State Library Leadership Institute for several years. Pat focuses on skills needed to support better productivity and workplace relationships, from personnel issues to strategic planning. She is known for her practical and good-humored programs.

User Research Methods

User Research Methods

Do you want feedback from your patrons? From surveys and focus groups to journey mapping and usability testing, our users can tell us a lot about what’s working well and how we can improve. In this presentation, learn a variety of methods and how they can be conducted safely at a distance, and what we can learn from feedback from users during the pandemic to help us in the years to come.

Slides

Original broadcast September 8, 2021 

Presenter; Rebecca Blakiston
Rebecca Blakiston is User Experience Strategist at the University of Arizona Libraries. She manages a small yet mighty team that empowers staff with the tools to make data-informed, empathy-driven decisions. Her team facilitates workshops, provides consultation, and partners with staff on projects of all types. In 2016, Rebecca was named a Library Journal Mover and Shaker. She wrote two practical guides for librarians: Usability Testing (2014) and Writing Effectively in Print and on the Web (2017). Since 2018, she’s been editor-in-chief of Weave: Journal of Library User Experience.

Boost Website Engagement

Boost Website Engagement

 

Have you ever taken a look at your website visits and wondered, “how many of these people used our services”? This webinar will discuss best practices and tools available to make website visitors into a library user – something that is determined by an action such as checking out materials, signing up for programs, or using online databases. We will discuss everything from chatbots to content placement and messaging to drive actions to your site.

Slides

Original broadcast September 2, 2021

Presenter: Brian Pichman
Brian Pichman is a technology enthusiast, sharing his thoughts and ideas to libraries so they can become more interactive, innovative, collaborative, and engaging He is a web developer with experience designing websites. Brian started a collaborative platform called the Evolve Project which aims to change the way people see libraries by introducing new technology and concepts for libraries. Libraries need to re-position themselves as community anchors in order to succeed in today’s culture.