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Library Technology Planning for Today and Tomorrow (3 of 5)

Library Technology Planning for Today and Tomorrow (3 of 5)

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The prospect of technology planning can seem overwhelming and time-consuming, especially for those who work in an already short-staffed library and today in a post-COVID-19 world. You may be thinking:

  • We haven’t had a technology plan up to now, and things seem fine. Why change?
  • There’s not enough money to add new equipment, so why should we even bother with planning for technology?
  • Let’s just continue to deal with technical issues as they arise.
  • It’s easier to “go with the flow” and buy new technology when we have some extra funds.
  • The city’s (or county’s or school district’s) IT department handles technology for our library, so we don’t need to worry about it.

Such thinking will prevent your library from becoming all that it might be. In truth, creating and implementing a technology plan can help you open the door to the modern era. Sound planning can lead to increased funding for technology in your library. Most importantly, a solid technology plan can help you create an environment that truly meets the needs of the community your library serves.

Lofty goals? Maybe so, but this is 100 percent true. Having a plan will allow you to prepare for the future instead of merely reacting to technology crises. Determining the technological needs of the library and its users will equip you with the ability to better use existing funds.

During this series, attendees will develop and work to implement a custom technology plan for their library or department. 

With the help of author Diana Silveira, attendees analyze the library’s current technology, understand their community and staff needs, develop a budget, and create a practical, comprehensive plan for them to implement. 

Diana Silveira is a librarian and President of Novare Library Services, where she works with libraries to develop, implement, and utilize technology effectively. Previously, she was employed by the Tampa Bay (FL) Library Consortium and the Charlotte Mecklenburg (NC) Library. She has an MLIS from UNC-Greensboro and a BS in psychology from Catawba College. Her book, Library Technology Planning for Today and Tomorrow, published by Rowman and Littlefield in 2018, is now available.

Class Resources

Slides

Chat Log

In partnership with PLAN,  webinars originally presented to their membership can now be found and accessed through Florida Library Webinars.

If you have questions about a session, contact PLAN.

Instagram – How to Use Stories, Reels, and Other Features to Drive donations and Raise awareness

Instagram – How to Use Stories, Reels, and Other Features to Drive donations and Raise awareness

 

Currently 1 billion people use Instagram, 35% of online adults use Instagram and 71% of U.S. businesses use Instagram.With hundreds of thousands of brands, nonprofits, and organizations creating accounts on Instagram, how can your group cut through the clutter and stand out? Whether your library is large or small, has a huge online presence or is just starting out, we will show you how to use Instagram to connect with stakeholders, tell powerful stories, and raise awareness about your programs and events. Join Julia Campbell, a digital marketing strategist who has successfully helped dozens of nonprofits and libraries use Instagram in their marketing and fundraising departments. In this webinar, we will walk you step-by-step through actionable ways to improve your Instagram profile, how to use Instagram to promote your online fundraising campaigns, and how to create the best types of Instagram posts that increase awareness, raise money, and build an engaged following of supporters and fans. You will leave with lots of ideas and tactical action steps for using Instagram to promote your library. During This Webinar You Will Learn: – How to get more followers on Instagram – How to use video on Instagram – How to use Instagram’s Stories and Reels to showcase your mission and impact – How to use Instagram contests to build your following and increase engagement – A review of some free and low-cost tools that nonprofits can use to create great visuals and graphics to post on Instagram.

Original broadcast February 10, 2021

Presenter~ Julia Campbell
Julia Campbell has a long history of helping nonprofits find success using digital storytelling strategies. After 10 years in the nonprofit sector as a small shop development and marketing director, she founded J Campbell Social Marketing, a boutique digital marketing agency based north of Boston. Julia received her Bachelor’s in Journalism & Communications from Boston University and earned a Master in Public Administration from Old Dominion University as well as a Certificate in Nonprofit Management from Tidewater Community College. A Boston native, a Returned Peace Corps Volunteer, a mother of two, and a lover of activism and social causes, Julia helps nonprofits build movements and connect with supporters by effectively harnessing the power and potential of online marketing and social media tools. Julia’s clients include small community-based nonprofits and large universities. She also offers small group coaching sessions, workshops & seminars and online trainings. The author of Storytelling in the Digital Age: A Guide for Nonprofits, Julia’s blog about online fundraising and nonprofit technology is #3 on the Top 40 Nonprofit Marketing Blogs and Websites for Nonprofit Marketers and Fundraisers and is consistently featured in the list of Top 150 Nonprofit Blogs in the world. Julia has been featured on Maximize Social Business, About.com, MarketWatch, Alltop, Salon, Social Media Today, Forbes and Business 2 Community.

Re-Thinking Online Reference: Providing Online Reference Services and Resources to Students and Faculty During COVID-19

Re-Thinking Online Reference: Providing Online Reference Services and Resources to Students and Faculty During COVID-19

 

 

The COVID-19 pandemic has required reference and instruction librarians at FIU to approach reference services with flexibility and creativity in order to ensure that students and faculty continue to receive the high level of service they expect. While additional online resources have made it easier to connect users with the information they need, librarians providing online reference using these resources need to be aware of the limitations and regulations governing these collections, adding another level of expertise to the mix.

This webinar will discuss the changes to reference FIU has made in order to adapt to COVID-19 and student/faculty needs, including going over how moving to an online-only reference model has affected the types of resources we can suggest. In addition, Elana will talk about how access to free resources made available by publishers to help augment electronic collections must be considered when providing reference services.

Slides

Original broadcast February 3, 2021 

Presenter ~ Elana Karshmer
Elana Karshmer, Ph.D., M.A. (L.I.S.) is the Head of Information & Research Services at Florida International University in Miami, Florida

Library Technology Planning for Today and Tomorrow (2 of 5)

Library Technology Planning for Today and Tomorrow (2 of 5)

PLAN Logo

The prospect of technology planning can seem overwhelming and time-consuming, especially for those who work in an already short-staffed library and today in a post-COVID-19 world. You may be thinking:

  • We haven’t had a technology plan up to now, and things seem fine. Why change?
  • There’s not enough money to add new equipment, so why should we even bother with planning for technology?
  • Let’s just continue to deal with technical issues as they arise.
  • It’s easier to “go with the flow” and buy new technology when we have some extra funds.
  • The city’s (or county’s or school district’s) IT department handles technology for our library, so we don’t need to worry about it.

Such thinking will prevent your library from becoming all that it might be. In truth, creating and implementing a technology plan can help you open the door to the modern era. Sound planning can lead to increased funding for technology in your library. Most importantly, a solid technology plan can help you create an environment that truly meets the needs of the community your library serves.

Lofty goals? Maybe so, but this is 100 percent true. Having a plan will allow you to prepare for the future instead of merely reacting to technology crises. Determining the technological needs of the library and its users will equip you with the ability to better use existing funds.

During this series, attendees will develop and work to implement a custom technology plan for their library or department. 

With the help of author Diana Silveira, attendees analyze the library’s current technology, understand their community and staff needs, develop a budget, and create a practical, comprehensive plan for them to implement. 

Diana Silveira is a librarian and President of Novare Library Services, where she works with libraries to develop, implement, and utilize technology effectively. Previously, she was employed by the Tampa Bay (FL) Library Consortium and the Charlotte Mecklenburg (NC) Library. She has an MLIS from UNC-Greensboro and a BS in psychology from Catawba College. Her book, Library Technology Planning for Today and Tomorrow, published by Rowman and Littlefield in 2018, is now available.

Class Resources

Slides

Chat Log

In partnership with PLAN,  webinars originally presented to their membership can now be found and accessed through Florida Library Webinars.

If you have questions about a session, contact PLAN.

Extended Reality: The Future of Collaboration

Extended Reality: The Future of Collaboration

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Extended reality (XR) includes 360-degree imagery, virtual reality (VR), augmented reality (AR), mixed reality (MR), and spatial computing.

These immersive technologies are storming every industry, and they are providing many new and different ways to communicate and collaborate in 3D spatial meeting rooms, for instance.

Join our speaker and tour guide for a look at possible new ways to work remotely, connect with groups, collaborate, and innovate!

Chad Mairn is a librarian, teacher, author, and self-described geek who frequently shares his enthusiasm for ‘all-things technology’ as a speaker at library and technology conferences. He is an Information Services Librarian, Assistant Professor, and manages the Innovation Lab at St. Petersburg College. Chad has written a couple of book chapters and numerous articles on library technologies. In 2016, Chad was awarded the League of Innovation Excellence Award in Teaching and Learning for Innovation in the Use of Technology! Chad plays drums in Low Season and he also co-organizes Gulf Coast Maker and Comic Con, which has been held at the St. Petersburg College Seminole Campus since 2014.

Class Resources

Slides

Chat Log

In partnership with PLAN,  webinars originally presented to their membership can now be found and accessed through Florida Library Webinars.

If you have questions about a session, contact PLAN.

Virtual Programs, Measurable Results

Virtual Programs, Measurable Results

 

In the current pandemic, many libraries have turned to virtual programming to continue serving their community while still adhering to social distancing guidelines. While there are well-established guidelines for assessing in-person programming, the same cannot be said for their virtual equivalents! Our speaker will explore the challenges of assessing a library’s virtual programs, and offer strategies to effectively measure their impact and success.

Slides

Original broadcast January 27, 2021 

Presenter ~ Nick Tanzi
Nick Tanzi has been incorporating emerging technologies into the library as a children’s librarian, the founding member of a digital services department, and most recently, as the Assistant Director of the South Huntington Public Library. During this time, he has spoken in the U.S. and abroad on topics ranging from social media marketing to 3D printing. He is the author of Making the Most of Digital Collections through Training and Outreach (2016), and Best Technologies for Public Libraries (2020). He writes “The Wired Library” column for Public Libraries Magazine. Tanzi was named a 2017 Dewey Fellow by the New York Library Association, and currently serves as President of its Making and STEAM Round Table.

Building Connections and Keeping Students Engaged in Online Courses

Building Connections and Keeping Students Engaged in Online Courses

 

Today’s students are juggling many responsibilities. Whether the student is a full-time working adult or a first-year student, the demands on their time are not decreasing. According to a report from Best Colleges, online students are becoming more diverse, and 47% of them choose online courses specifically for the flexibility they offer. However, keeping a diverse group of students engaged when there are competing demands on their time can be challenging.

In order to build connections, instructors must lessen the distance the students feel between themselves and their peers, and between themselves and the instructor. In this session, the presenter will share strategies for mitigating transactional distance and building connections with students in order to keep students engaged.

Handout

Original broadcast January 20, 2021

Presenter ~ Lauren Hays
Lauren Hays, PhD, is an Assistant Professor of Instructional Technology at the University of Central Missouri. Previously, she was the Instructional and Research Librarian at MidAmerica Nazarene University in Olathe, KS where she enjoyed teaching and being a member of her institution’s Faculty Development Committee. Her professional interests include the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, information literacy, digital literacy, educational technology, and academic development. On a personal note, she loves dogs, traveling, and home.

Library Technology Planning for Today and Tomorrow (2 of 5)

Library Technology Training for Today and Tomorrow (1 of 5)

PLAN Logo

The prospect of technology planning can seem overwhelming and time-consuming, especially for those who work in an already short-staffed library and today in a post-COVID-19 world. You may be thinking:

  • We haven’t had a technology plan up to now, and things seem fine. Why change?
  • There’s not enough money to add new equipment, so why should we even bother with planning for technology?
  • Let’s just continue to deal with technical issues as they arise.
  • It’s easier to “go with the flow” and buy new technology when we have some extra funds.
  • The city’s (or county’s or school district’s) IT department handles technology for our library, so we don’t need to worry about it.

Such thinking will prevent your library from becoming all that it might be. In truth, creating and implementing a technology plan can help you open the door to the modern era. Sound planning can lead to increased funding for technology in your library. Most importantly, a solid technology plan can help you create an environment that truly meets the needs of the community your library serves.

Lofty goals? Maybe so, but this is 100 percent true. Having a plan will allow you to prepare for the future instead of merely reacting to technology crises. Determining the technological needs of the library and its users will equip you with the ability to better use existing funds.

During this series, attendees will develop and work to implement a custom technology plan for their library or department. 

With the help of author Diana Silveira, attendees analyze the library’s current technology, understand their community and staff needs, develop a budget, and create a practical, comprehensive plan for them to implement. 

This course will consist of five online classes.

Diana Silveira is a librarian and President of Novare Library Services, where she works with libraries to develop, implement, and utilize technology effectively. Previously, she was employed by the Tampa Bay (FL) Library Consortium and the Charlotte Mecklenburg (NC) Library. She has an MLIS from UNC-Greensboro and a BS in psychology from Catawba College. Her book, Library Technology Planning for Today and Tomorrow, published by Rowman and Littlefield in 2018, is now available.

Class Resources

Slides

Chat Log

In partnership with PLAN,  webinars originally presented to their membership can now be found and accessed through Florida Library Webinars.

If you have questions about a session, contact PLAN.

Gamar: Adding Layers to Library Instruction Through Augmented Reality

Gamar: Adding Layers to Library Instruction Through Augmented Reality

TBLC logo

Augmented reality can be an engaging way for students and patrons to interact with the library. From orientations to learn about different library services to scavenger hunts to play a game, there are many uses for augmented reality in the library. At Texas A&M we use GAMAR, which can be accessed from any mobile device. In this presentation we will discuss augmented reality, our experience with using GAMAR in an instructional environment, other potential uses for GAMAR, and some of the pros and cons of an augmented reality activity.

Presenter: Alex Mitchell

Alex Mitchell is a First Year Experience Librarian at Texas A&M University. She teaches information literacy sessions for first year english composition and literature students and our first year experience courses for first time college students. Alex occasionally teaches a section of the English Rhetoric and Composition course and also teaches a section of the first year experience course with a library focus. She has worked for the A&M system since 2015 at both the Galveston and College Station campuses. She holds a BA in History with an education focus from the University of Texas at Austin and a MS in Library Science from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

In partnership with TBLC,  webinars originally presented to their membership can now be found and accessed through Florida Library Webinars.

If you have questions about a session, contact TBLC.

Hybrid/Blended Learning: Combining the Best of Virtual and “In-Person” Education

Hybrid/Blended Learning: Combining the Best of Virtual and “In-Person” Education

 

Learning online has many benefits as compared to a traditional in-person classroom, which meets only at one time and one physical place. You can attend a live or recorded webcast with your feet up, in your pajamas, with a cat on your lap, and a handy bowl of hot, buttered popcorn nearby. You can complete your class requirements at 2 am, easily visit with classmates all over the world, and finish the assignments at your convenience. Depending on the platform, if you don’t want to compete for an instructor’s attention in a face-to-face class, you can interact via text without being judged on how you look or sound, or how assertively you speak up. However, a digital course, even with videoconferencing, has limitations. Since most people have spent years in traditional classrooms, the digital version can feel at times like a second-rate experience. The need for structured presentations can reduce the spontaneity–and serendipity–of an in-person meeting. And, sometimes, even with interactive components, it is easier for students to disengage online. Multi-tasking is a common practice during live and recording virtual presentations. The best solutions might be combining what we know works best from both virtual and in-person educational strategies, with an appropriate mix of technology. Learn several models that can work with both adults and children. (And you don’t necessarily need an expensive computer platform to make it work!)

During this session, we will explore how to:
Apply the Gold Standard for creating blended/hybrid classes: Retention, motivation, and application. –
Expand learning beyond YouTube, Ted Talks, and webinars (like this one).
Take advantage of social media platforms such as Facebook and LinkedIn for group discussions.
Move activities offline into participants’ workplaces and lives.

Slides

Original broadcast January 13, 2021

Presenter ~ Pat Wagner
Pat Wagner has been a trainer and consultant for libraries since 1978 using e-mail, platforms, and now social media to serve clients across the United States (and the solar system) who she has never met face-to-face.. She presents at state and national library conferences as well as working with libraries of all types from Alaska to Florida. She has been a frequent visitor to Florida libraries and was a facilitator for the Sunshine State Library Leadership Institute for several years. Pat focuses on skills needed to support better productivity and workplace relationships, from personnel issues to strategic planning. She is known for her practical and good-humored programs.